Diabetes target achievement up from 1999 to 2010, more needed

April 25, 2013
Diabetes target achievement up from 1999 to 2010, more needed
For U.S. adults with diabetes there has been an improvement in achievement of targets from 1999 to 2010, but many still do not meet the recommended goals, according to research published in the April 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

(HealthDay)—For U.S. adults with diabetes there has been an improvement in achievement of targets from 1999 to 2010, but many still do not meet the recommended goals, according to research published in the April 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Mohammed K. Ali, M.B., Ch.B., M.B.A., from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, and colleagues used data from the National Health and and the Surveillance System to investigate risk-factor control, preventive practices, and risk scores for coronary heart disease for adults with self-reported diabetes over the 1999 to 2010 period.

The authors found that there was an increase in the weighted proportion of survey participants who met the recommended targets for diabetes care from 1999 through 2010 (7.9 percent for glycemic control, 9.4 percent for individualized glycemic targets, 11.7 percent for blood pressure, and 20.8 percent for lipid levels). There was no significant change in tobacco use. There was a 2.8 to 3.7 percent decrease in the 10-year probability of . The targets for glycemic control, blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were not met by 33.4 to 48.7 percent of those with diabetes, while only 14.3 percent met the targets for all three measures and for tobacco use.

"Although there were improvements in risk-factor control and adherence to preventive practices from 1999 to 2010, tobacco use remained high, and almost half of U.S. adults with diabetes did not meet the recommended goals for diabetes care," the authors write.

Explore further: Diabetes self-care improves slowly, US report finds

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Diabetes self-care improves slowly, US report finds

April 24, 2013

(HealthDay)— More Americans are meeting diabetes care goals, but nearly half still aren't achieving major targets for controlling blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol, government health officials say.

Room for improvement in knowledge of ABC levels, goals

April 19, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Many individuals with diabetes do not know their last hemoglobin A1C (A1C), blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels (ABC levels), although the correlation between such knowledge ...

Cardiac disease risk factors prevalent among U.S. teens

May 21, 2012

(HealthDay) -- From 1999 to 2008 the prevalence of several cardiovascular disease risk factors remained stable among U.S. adolescents, but the burden of risk factors is still considerable, according to a study published online ...

Recommended for you

New theory on how insulin resistance, metabolic disease begin

September 26, 2016

Does eating too much sugar cause type 2 diabetes? The answer may not be simple, but a study published Sept. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation adds to growing research linking excessive sugar consumption—specifically ...

Unique molecular atlas of pancreas produced

September 23, 2016

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have managed to produce the first molecular map of the genes that are active in the various cells of the human pancreas. They have also revealed differences in genetic activity between ...

Can long naps cause diabetes?

September 14, 2016

A study presented at a scientific congress Thursday reported a link between long naps and a higher risk of diabetes, though it couldn't say if daytime sleeping was a symptom or a cause.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.