English-acculturated hispanics report less sun-safe behavior

English-acculturated hispanics report less sun-safe behavior
English-acculturated and bicultural (high English and Spanish acculturation) Hispanic adults report lower engagement in skin cancer-related behaviors, according to a study published online April 17 in JAMA Dermatology.

(HealthDay)—English-acculturated and bicultural (high English and Spanish acculturation) Hispanic adults report lower engagement in skin cancer-related behaviors, according to a study published online April 17 in JAMA Dermatology.

Elliot J. Coups, Ph.D., from the Cancer Institute of New Jersey in New Brunswick, and colleagues conducted an online survey study in five southern and western U.S. states involving 788 Hispanic adults to examine the association between linguistic acculturation and skin cancer-related behaviors.

The researchers found that the rates of shade seeking and use of sun protective clothing were lower and rates of sunbathing and were higher among English-acculturated than Spanish-acculturated Hispanics. The rates of sunbathing and indoor tanning were comparably high for English-acculturated and bicultural Hispanics. Shade seeking and use of sun protective clothing were reported less often among bicultural Hispanics than Spanish-acculturated Hispanics, but more often than among English-acculturated Hispanics. There was no correlation found between acculturation and sunscreen use.

"Hispanic adults do not routinely engage in behaviors that reduce their risk of skin cancer," the authors write. "Bicultural and English-acculturated Hispanics are particularly in need of ."

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