FDA warns consumers of dangers of the stimulant DMAA

FDA warns consumers of dangers of the stimulant DMAA
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is attempting to halt distribution of dietary supplements that contain the stimulant dimethylamylamine, following reports of illness and death associated with these supplements.

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is attempting to halt distribution of dietary supplements that contain the stimulant dimethylamylamine (DMAA), following reports of illness and death associated with these supplements.

The FDA has received about 60 reports of illness and death associated with supplements containing , mostly voluntary reports from consumers and health care practitioners. The reports include heart problems and nervous system or psychiatric disorders. DMAA can elevate blood pressure and could lead to ; it may be particularly dangerous when used with caffeine.

In an effort to halt the further distribution of that use DMAA from the marketplace, the FDA has warned that products containing DMAA are illegal. All but one of the companies have agreed to stop using DMAA as an ingredient in their dietary supplements.

"Consumers may mistakenly look at a capsule and think that FDA has signed off on that product as safe and effective prior to that product appearing on the market, as we do with drugs and other medical products," Daniel Fabricant, Ph.D., director of the FDA's Division of Dietary Supplement Program, said in a statement. "In contrast, with dietary supplements, there is no pre-market approval, and once a product is on the market, the burden is on the FDA to prove that a product is unsafe."

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