Mediterranean diet adherence cuts cognitive impairment

Mediterranean diet adherence cuts cognitive impairment
Greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower likelihood of incident cognitive impairment, especially among those without diabetes, according to a study published in the April 30 issue of Neurology.

(HealthDay)—Greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet (MeD) is associated with a lower likelihood of incident cognitive impairment (ICI), especially among those without diabetes, according to a study published in the April 30 issue of Neurology.

Georgios Tsivgoulis, M.D., from the University of Athens in Greece, and colleagues examined the correlation between adherence to MeD and the likelihood of ICI. Data were collected from 17,478 individuals enrolled in the Reasons for Geographic and in Stroke study 2003 to 2007.

During a mean follow-up of 4.0 years, the researchers identified ICI in 7 percent of the participants. Before and after adjustment for potential cofounders, including demographics, environmental factors, depressive symptoms, and self-reported health, higher adherence to MeD correlated with a lower likelihood of ICI (odds ratio, 0.89 and 0.87, respectively). The association between adherence to MeD and ICI was not affected by race but was affected by diabetes mellitus; high adherence to MeD correlated with significantly lower odds of ICI in individuals without diabetes (odds ratio, 0.81) but not in individuals with diabetes.

"Higher adherence to MeD was associated with a lower likelihood of ICI independent of potential confounders," the authors write. "This association was moderated by [the] presence of ."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Meds adherence self-report valid in type 2 diabetes

Dec 20, 2012

(HealthDay)—Self-reported measures of medication adherence in adults with type 2 diabetes are valid, although some self-reports are moderated by depression, according to a study published online Nov. 30 ...

Timing, duration of obesity impact adult diabetes risk

Apr 05, 2013

(HealthDay)—The likelihood of diabetes in young adulthood is increased for those who are obese as adolescents and those with persistent obesity, compared to those with adult-onset obesity, according to ...

Recommended for you

Memory in silent neurons

18 hours ago

According to a generally-accepted model of synaptic plasticity, a neuron that communicates with others of the same kind emits an electrical impulse as well as activating its synapses transiently. This electrical ...

Why your favourite song takes you down memory lane

Aug 28, 2014

Music triggers different functions of the brain, which helps explain why listening to a song you like might be enjoyable but a favourite song may plunge you into nostalgia, scientists said on Thursday.

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of brain boosts memory

Aug 28, 2014

Stimulating a particular region in the brain via non-invasive delivery of electrical current using magnetic pulses, called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, improves memory, reports a new Northwestern Medicine ...

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

VOR
not rated yet Apr 30, 2013
I guess we can find out what Mediterranean diet means, but it would be much more informative to have described the non-ethnic specific food aspects and proportions instead of a generality.