Pediatric melanomas are increasing two percent a year

Pediatric melanomas are increasing 2 percent a year
The incidence of pediatric melanoma has increased by about 2 percent per year, and this incidence trend is influenced by gender, age, and stage at diagnosis, primary site, and ultraviolet-B exposure, according to research published online April 1 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay)—The incidence of pediatric melanoma has increased by about 2 percent per year, and this incidence trend is influenced by gender, age, and stage at diagnosis, primary site, and ultraviolet (UV)-B exposure, according to research published online April 15 in Pediatrics.

Jeannette R. Wong, M.P.H., of the in Rockville, Md., and colleagues analyzed data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program to describe the incidence trend of childhood and adolescent melanoma.

According to the researchers, 1,230 children were diagnosed with between 1973 and 2009. Pediatric melanoma was noted to increase by an average of 2 percent per year. Girls had a significantly higher incidence rate than boys, 7.4 versus 4.6 percent. Incidence rate was noted to increase with age, with the highest incidence among 15- to 19-year-old children. Incidence rate increased in low UV-B exposure geographical areas, whereas the incidence rate remained stable in high UV-B exposure areas over the study period.

"Melanoma incidence continues to increase from previous studies, especially in adolescents and sun-exposed areas of the body with some evidence for ," the authors write. "Future individual-level studies are needed to elucidate the underlying reasons for the increasing incidence of adolescent melanoma."

More information: Abstract
Full Text

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Risk of second primary melanoma up in pediatric patients

Jun 28, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Pediatric patients diagnosed with an invasive cutaneous melanoma have nearly double the relative risk of developing a subsequent primary melanoma, compared with adults, according to a study ...

Melanoma rates rising in US children

Apr 03, 2013

(HealthDay)—Melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, doesn't usually occur in kids, but a new study shows that it's happening more often.

Recommended for you

Crankier babies may get more TV time

Apr 14, 2014

(HealthDay)—Fussy and demanding babies are likely to spend slightly more time plopped in front of a TV or computer screen when they're toddlers than are "easier" babies, new research finds.

User comments