Pot smoking linked to some metabolic changes

April 19, 2013
Pot smoking linked to some metabolic changes
Regularly smoking pot is associated with visceral adiposity and adipose tissue insulin resistance, but not other metabolic changes such as impaired β-cell function or hepatic steatosis, according to a study published online March 25 in Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay)—Regularly smoking pot is associated with visceral adiposity and adipose tissue insulin resistance, but not other metabolic changes such as impaired β-cell function or hepatic steatosis, according to a study published online March 25 in Diabetes Care.

Ranganath Muniyappa, M.D., Ph.D., from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases in Bethesda, Md., and colleagues compared abdominal fat depots, intrahepatic fat content, insulin sensitivity, and beta-cell function in 30 cannabis smokers (median of six joints a day for a median of 9.5 years) and 30 matched controls.

The researchers found that, although carbohydrate intake and percent calories from carbohydrates were significantly higher for the cannabis group, total energy intake was similar in both groups. Cannabis smokers had a significantly higher percent abdominal visceral fat (18 versus 12 percent), significantly lower plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (49 versus 55 mg/dL), and a significantly lower adipocyte insulin resistance index and percent suppression during an .

"Chronic cannabis smoking was associated with visceral adiposity and adipose tissue but not with hepatic steatosis, insulin insensitivity, impaired pancreatic β-cell function, or glucose intolerance," Muniyappa and colleagues conclude.

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Canis Maximus
5 / 5 (1) Apr 19, 2013
Will someone please explain:
"significantly lower plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (49 versus 55 mg/dL), and a significantly lower adipocyte insulin resistance index and percent free fatty acids suppression during an oral glucose tolerance test."

for someone not as versed in diabetic etymology?
Mauricio
1 / 5 (1) Apr 19, 2013
http://healthland...-weight/

and this is my personal experience. I know a whole lot of cannabis smokers, and most are skinny, skinnier than the average by far.

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