Prevalence of self-reported hypertension rises in US

Prevalence of self-reported hypertension rises in U.S.
The prevalence of self-reported hypertension among U.S. adults increased slightly, but significantly from 2005 to 2009, and the proportion of adults using anti-hypertensive medications also increased, according to research published April 4 in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly.

(HealthDay)—The prevalence of self-reported hypertension among U.S. adults increased slightly, but significantly from 2005 to 2009, and the proportion of adults using anti-hypertensive medications also increased, according to research published April 4 in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly.

Jing Fang, M.D., of the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, U.S. in Atlanta, and colleagues analyzed data from Surveillance System (BRFSS) from 2005 to 2009 to determine state-level trends in self-reported and the use of anti-hypertensive medications among U.S. adults.

According to the researchers, the prevalence of self-reported hypertension increased slightly, but significantly from 25.8 percent to 28.3 percent. Among those who reported to have hypertension, the use of anti-hypertensive medications also increased from 61.1 percent to 62.6 percent. There were significant variations in self-reported hypertension and treatment by age, gender, race/ethnicity, levels of education and geographical locations.

"Increasing awareness of hypertension, improving hypertension control, and encouraging adherence to evidence-based practices addressing hypertension are needed, especially in those states with higher prevalence of hypertension and lower proportion of use of anti-hypertensive medications," the authors write.

More information: Full Text

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Community-based study IDs prevalence of HTN in children

Jan 28, 2013

(HealthDay)—The prevalence of prehypertension and hypertension is lower than previously reported in school-based cohorts, according to a large community-based study published online Jan. 28 in Pediatrics.

Recommended for you

AMA examines economic impact of physicians

1 hour ago

(HealthDay)—Physicians who mainly engage in patient care contribute a total of $1.6 trillion in economic output, according to the American Medical Association (AMA)'s Economic Impact Study.

Less-schooled whites lose longevity, study finds

1 hour ago

Barbara Gentry slowly shifts her heavy frame out of a chair and uses a walker to move the dozen feet to a chair not far from the pool table at the Buford Senior Center. Her hair is white and a cough sometimes interrupts her ...

How to keep your fitness goals on track

1 hour ago

(HealthDay)—The New Year's resolutions many made to get fit have stalled by now. And one expert thinks that's because many people set their goals too high.

Suddenly health insurance is not for sale

Apr 18, 2014

(HealthDay)— Darlene Tucker, an independent insurance broker in Scotts Hill, Tenn., says health insurers in her area aren't selling policies year-round anymore.

User comments