Prevalence of self-reported hypertension rises in US

Prevalence of self-reported hypertension rises in U.S.
The prevalence of self-reported hypertension among U.S. adults increased slightly, but significantly from 2005 to 2009, and the proportion of adults using anti-hypertensive medications also increased, according to research published April 4 in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly.

(HealthDay)—The prevalence of self-reported hypertension among U.S. adults increased slightly, but significantly from 2005 to 2009, and the proportion of adults using anti-hypertensive medications also increased, according to research published April 4 in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly.

Jing Fang, M.D., of the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, U.S. in Atlanta, and colleagues analyzed data from Surveillance System (BRFSS) from 2005 to 2009 to determine state-level trends in self-reported and the use of anti-hypertensive medications among U.S. adults.

According to the researchers, the prevalence of self-reported hypertension increased slightly, but significantly from 25.8 percent to 28.3 percent. Among those who reported to have hypertension, the use of anti-hypertensive medications also increased from 61.1 percent to 62.6 percent. There were significant variations in self-reported hypertension and treatment by age, gender, race/ethnicity, levels of education and geographical locations.

"Increasing awareness of hypertension, improving hypertension control, and encouraging adherence to evidence-based practices addressing hypertension are needed, especially in those states with higher prevalence of hypertension and lower proportion of use of anti-hypertensive medications," the authors write.

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