Runners achieve greater weight loss than walkers

April 1, 2013
Runners achieve greater weight loss than walkers
Runners lose more weight than walkers, according to a large study published the April issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

(HealthDay)—Runners lose more weight than walkers, according to a large study published in the April issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

Paul T. Williams, Ph.D., from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, analyzed survey results from questionnaires completed at baseline and after 6.2 years from 15,237 and 32,216 runners.

Williams found that, at baseline, both male and female walkers spent less energy walking than runners spent and were significantly heavier than runners. Energy expenditure declined less for walking in walkers than for running in over the course of the study. There was an inverse relationship between change in body mass index (BMI) and both change in metabolic equivalent of task (MET)-hours per day run and change in MET-hours per day walked. The relationship was stronger in the change of MET-hours per day run than walked in men and in heavier women. In the fourth BMI quartile for both sexes there was approximately a 90 percent greater loss per MET-hours per day run than walked. Age-related weight gain was minimized significantly by running in both sexes and by walking in women.

"Although change in BMI was significantly associated with both change in MET-hours per day run and walked, the change in BMI was significantly greater for change in running than change in walking," the author writes.

Explore further: Nearly half of runners may be drinking too much during races

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Higher intelligence score means better physical performance

August 14, 2015

New research reveals a distinct association between male intelligence in early adulthood and their subsequent midlife physical performance. The higher intelligence score, the better physical performance, the study reveals. ...

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Lurker2358
1 / 5 (2) Apr 01, 2013
This is another "Duh" science article.

Running produce greater momenta and greater kinetic energy, therefore more energy from your body must be expended, even if you are moving the same distance.
DirtySquirties
1 / 5 (2) Apr 02, 2013
D:
You don't say!

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.