UN urges strict hygiene to avoid spread of H7N9 virus

The United Nations on Friday presented a list of recommendations, including a strict hygiene culture and keeping different breeds of animals apart, to try to curb the spreading of the H7N9 flu virus which has killed six people in China.

"With the harder to detect, good biosecurity measures become even more essential to reducing the risk of to humans and ," said Juan Lubroth, the chief veterinary officer of the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO).

Among the precautions, the FAO recommended farmers and other livestock handlers to regularly wash their hands and keep animals separate from living areas, warning that "close contact with infected animals can put people at risk".

The organisation also said people should avoid eating sick animals and that they should not be fed to other animals.

It recommended keeping different types of animals and species apart and to cull infected animals "if the human threat is confirmed as animal in origin".

"It is important that all signs of illness or sudden and unexplained deaths in poultry, farmed birds, or other animals are reported to the authorities so that they can deal with them safely and help stop the virus spreading," it said.

Lubroth said that "with this virus we don't have a red flag that immediately signals an infection. This means farmers may not be aware that virus is circulating in their flock. Biosecurity and hygiene measures will help people protect themselves from virus circulating in seemingly healthy birds or other animals."

The number of confirmed in China rose to 16 Friday, with four of the six fatalities in Shanghai. Officials said two new infection cases had been detected in the eastern province of Jiangsu, and a seven-year-old girl had been quarantined in Hong Kong for tests after returning from Shanghai, showing flu-like symptoms.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

China begins poultry cull after bird flu found

Apr 04, 2013

Authorities in Shanghai began the mass slaughter of poultry at a market after the H7N9 bird flu virus, which has killed five people in China, was detected there, state media said Friday.

Hong Kong girl tests negative for H7N9 (Update)

Apr 05, 2013

A seven-year-old Hong Kong girl has tested negative for the H7N9 flu virus, officials said Friday, after she became the city's first suspected case of the disease that has killed six killed on mainland China.

China kills market birds as flu found in pigeons

Apr 05, 2013

(AP)—China announced a sixth death from a new bird flu strain Friday, while authorities in Shanghai halted the sale of live fowl and slaughtered all poultry at a market where the virus was detected in pigeons ...

UN agency warns on mutant bird flu in China, Vietnam

Aug 29, 2011

The UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) on Monday warned about a new mutant strain of the deadly bird flu H5N1 virus in China and Vietnam, saying there could be a "major resurgence" of the disease.

Recommended for you

Increasing malarial drug resistance a growing threat

9 hours ago

(HealthDay)—The parasite that causes malaria is growing increasingly resistant to the drugs commonly used to fight it, according to new surveillance reports. But several new drugs are in development, and ...

User comments