Antimicrobial resistance in Vietnam

May 7, 2013

Heiman Wertheim and Arjun Chandna from Oxford University and colleagues describe the launch and impact of VINARES, an initiative to strengthen antimicrobial stewardship in Viet Nam, which may be instructive for other countries struggling to address the threat of antimicrobial resistance.

Antimicrobial resistance is increasingly recognised as a serious contemporary global (with numerous calls for action from the international community), but while interventions to control antimicrobial resistance are available, implementation is developing countries (where the threat is greatest) is challenging.

The authors describe the challenges faced in Viet Nam and how they launched and have measured the impact of VINARES, which is intended to galvanize political and medical leadership including national and local stakeholders and to provide "the impetus and infrastructure for self-sufficient and antimicrobial stewardship in Vietnam for the long-term."

Explore further: Infection prevention groups outline steps needed to preserve antibiotics

More information: Wertheim HFL, Chandna A, Vu PD, Pham CV, Nguyen PDT, et al. (2013) Providing Impetus, Tools, and Guidance to Strengthen National Capacity for Antimicrobial Stewardship in Viet Nam. PLoS Med 10(5):e1001429. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001429

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