Antismoking messages in media linked to intention to quit

Antismoking messages in media linked to intention to quit
Awareness of antismoking messages in a single media channel or in multiple media channels is associated with intention to quit smoking, according to research published in the May 31 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

(HealthDay)—Awareness of antismoking messages in a single media channel or in multiple media channels is associated with intention to quit smoking, according to research published in the May 31 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

Roberta B. Caixeta, from the Pan American Health Organization in Washington, D.C., and colleagues used data from 17 countries that participated in the Global Adult Tobacco Survey to examine the correlation between awareness of anti-cigarette information in mass media channels (television, radio, billboards, and newspapers or magazines) with a current smoker's intention to quit.

The researchers found that in nine countries there was a significant correlation between intent to quit and awareness of antismoking messages in a single media channel versus no awareness, with odds ratios ranging from 1.3 to 1.9. In 14 countries there was a significant correlation for intent to quit and awareness of messages in multiple channels compared with no awareness, with odds ratios ranging from 1.5 to 3.2. The odds ratios were adjusted for demographic factors, awareness of warning labels on cigarette packages, and awareness of tobacco advertisements.

"Antismoking information in mass media channels can help reduce tobacco consumption by encouraging smokers to contemplate quitting and might be more effective when presented in multiple channels," the authors write.

More information: Full Text

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Contraband tobacco use hinders smoking cessation

Mar 04, 2013

People who smoke low-cost contraband cigarettes in Canada are less likely to stop smoking in the short term compared with people who smoke more expensive premium or discount cigarettes, according to a study published in CMAJ (Canad ...

Anti-tobacco TV ads help adults stop smoking, study finds

Apr 19, 2012

Anti-tobacco television advertising helps reduce adult smoking, according to a study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago's Institute for Health Research and Policy -- but some ads may be more effective ...

Electronic cigarettes gaining awareness, use

Feb 28, 2013

Increased awareness and use of electronic cigarettes in the U.S. outlined in a study released Thursday highlights the need for government regulation and evaluation, the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's ...

Recommended for you

Obama offers new accommodations on birth control

5 minutes ago

The Obama administration will offer a new accommodation to religious nonprofits that object to covering birth control for their employees. The measure allows those groups to notify the government, rather than their insurance ...

Use a rule of thumb to control how much you drink

44 minutes ago

Sticking to a general rule of pouring just a half glass of wine limits the likelihood of overconsumption, even for men with a higher body mass index. That's the finding of a new Iowa State and Cornell University ...

Many patients are discharged without a diagnosis

4 hours ago

Chest pain, breathing difficulties, fainting. Each year approx. 265,000 Danes are acutely admitted to medical departments with symptoms of serious illness. New research from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital ...

Wellness visits, physicals need different documentation

4 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Documentation rules for annual wellness visits (AWVs) for Medicare differ from those for preventive visits, which are not covered by Medicare, according to an article published Aug. 5 in Medical Ec ...

User comments