Application for health coverage has been simplified, shortened

Application for health coverage has been simplified, shortened
The application for health insurance coverage has been simplified and shortened, with the application reduced to three pages for individuals, according to a report released April 30 by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

(HealthDay)—The application for health insurance coverage has been simplified and shortened, with the application reduced to three pages for individuals, according to a report released April 30 by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

First-time consumers are able to complete one application and review the range of options available, including plans in the Health Insurance Marketplace, Medicaid, and the Children's Health Program. In addition, consumers will be able to see tax credits that will help pay for premiums.

Enrollment begins Oct. 1, 2013, at which point consumers will be able to apply online, by phone, or via paper. The online version of the application will be shortened based on the applicants' responses. The paper application has also been simplified and has been reduced to three pages for individuals and reduced by two-thirds for families. The consumer-focused approach will facilitate enrollment while minimizing administrative burden on states, individuals, and health plans.

"Consumers will have a simple, easy-to-understand way to apply for health coverage later this year," Marilyn Tavenner, acting administrator at CMS, said in a statement. "The application for individuals is now three pages, making it easier to use and significantly shorter than industry standards. This is another step complete as we get ready for a consumer-friendly marketplace that will be open for business later this year."

More information: More Information

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Premiums for public health insurance affect coverage

Feb 08, 2013

Requiring individuals to pay a premium for public health insurance coverage can counteract the coverage effects of expanding eligibility for public health insurance programs to higher income families.

Recommended for you

A heart-felt need for dairy food

39 minutes ago

A daily small serve of dairy food may reduce the risk of heart disease or stroke, even in communities where such foods have not traditionally formed part of the diet.

Organic food may cause fewer pre-eclampsia cases

55 minutes ago

Pregnant women who often eat organic vegetables have a lower risk of pre-eclampsia than women who rarely or never do. This is shown in an article using data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study ...

Hazelwood coal fire linked to 11 deaths

1 hour ago

It is likely air pollution from the 2014 Hazelwood coal mine fire in Victoria caused the premature deaths of 11 people, a QUT health researcher said.

Reduce your risk of falls

2 hours ago

If you are over 65 and have had a fall before, researchers at the University of Sydney think you should balance on one leg to brush your teeth, bend your knees to pack the dishwasher and take the stairs more often.

User comments