ATS: Early prone positioning reduces mortality in ARDS

ATS: early prone positioning reduces mortality in ARDS
For patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, prolonged prone positioning during mechanical ventilation is associated with significantly reduced mortality at 28 and 90 days, according to a study published online May 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American Thoracic Society, held from May 17 to 22 in Philadelphia.

(HealthDay)—For patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), prolonged prone positioning during mechanical ventilation is associated with significantly reduced mortality at 28 and 90 days, according to a study published online May 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American Thoracic Society, held from May 17 to 22 in Philadelphia.

Claude Guérin, M.D., Ph.D., from the Hôpital de la Croix-Rousse in Lyon, France, and colleagues examined the effect of early application of prone positioning on outcomes in a multicenter involving 466 patients with severe ARDS. Participants were randomized to undergo prone positioning of at least 16 hours (237 patients) or to be left in a supine position (229 patients).

The researchers found that 28-day mortality was significantly lower in the prone group (16.0 percent) compared with the supine group (32.8 percent; hazard ratio for death with prone positioning, 0.39). The unadjusted 90-day mortality was significantly lower in the prone versus the supine group (23.6 versus 41.0 percent; hazard ratio, 0.44). There was no significant between-group difference in the incidence of complications, with the exception of cardiac arrest incidence, which was higher in the supine group.

"In patients with severe ARDS, early application of prolonged prone-positioning sessions significantly decreased 28-day and 90-day mortality," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and health care industries.

More information: Abstract
Full Text
Editorial
More Information

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Albumin improves bacterial peritonitis outcomes

Feb 07, 2013

(HealthDay)—For patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), albumin infusion is associated with reduced renal impairment and decreased mortality, according to research published in the February ...

Recommended for you

Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

8 hours ago

Senegalese authorities on Monday were monitoring everyone who was in contact with a student infected with Ebola who crossed into the country, and who has lost three family members to the disease.

Cerebral palsy may be hereditary

14 hours ago

Cerebral palsy is a neurological developmental disorder which follows an injury to the immature brain before, during or after birth. The resulting condition affects the child's ability to move and in some ...

19 new dengue cases in Japan, linked to Tokyo park

20 hours ago

Japan is urging local authorities to be on the lookout for further outbreaks of dengue fever, after confirming another 19 cases that were contracted at a popular local park in downtown Tokyo.

User comments