Even low blood lead levels may impact children's cognition

May 13, 2013
Even low blood lead levels may impact children's cognition
Blood lead levels of 5 µg/dL or greater correlate with reduced reading readiness at entry to kindergarten, according to a study published online May 13 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay)—Blood lead levels (BLLs) of 5 µg/dL or greater correlate with reduced reading readiness at entry to kindergarten, according to a study published online May 13 in Pediatrics.

Pat McLaine, Dr.P.H., M.P.H., R.N., from the University of Maryland School of Nursing in Baltimore, and colleagues linked kindergarten reading readiness for 3,406 children attending public kindergarten in Providence, R.I., with of blood lead testing.

The researchers found that the median geometric mean BLL was 4.2 µg/dL and that one-fifth of children had one or more venous BLLs at or above 10 µg/dL. Compared with children with BLLs <5 µg/dL, failing to achieve the national benchmark for reading readiness was increased for those with BLLs of 5 to 9 and ≥10 µg/dL (adjusted prevalence ratio, 1.21 and 1.56, respectively), while on average, the reading scores decreased by 4.5 and 10.0 points, respectively.

"These results suggest that lead exposure at levels well below 10 µg/dL contributes to decreased reading readiness at kindergarten entry," the authors write. "Future evaluation of on end-of-grade tests later in elementary school (third and fourth grades) in this diverse cohort could help us to better understand the long-term impacts of both kindergarten reading readiness and childhood lead exposure on school success."

Explore further: Despite big progress, many kids have high lead levels in blood (Update)

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Youth dance classes score low in physical activity

May 18, 2015

For parents who send their kids to dance classes to get some exercise, a new study from researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine suggests most youth dance classes provide only limited amounts ...

Roller coaster rides trigger pediatric stroke

December 11, 2014

Riding a couple roller coasters at an amusement park appears to have triggered an unusual stroke in a 4-year-old boy, according to a report in the journal Pediatric Neurology.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.