Blood-tracking device uses new technology

(HealthDay)—The first device to use Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology to help workers track blood products and prevent the release of unsuitable samples has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The iTrace for Blood Centers device uses a memory-storage chip on the item being tracked. In addition to barcode identification systems already in place, the new device provides another layer of protection in product tracking, the agency said in a news release.

The device can track information including a product code, blood type and expiration date, the FDA said.

iTrace is manufactured by SysLogic Inc., based in Brookfield, Wis.

More information: The FDA has more about this approval.

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