Cognitive health info from doctors found to be lacking

Cognitive health info from doctors found to be lacking
Communication between patients and physicians regarding activities that may be beneficial to maintaining cognitive functioning during aging may be lacking, according to a study published online April 18 in Preventing Chronic Disease.

(HealthDay)—Communication between patients and physicians regarding activities that may be beneficial to maintaining cognitive functioning during aging may be lacking, according to a study published online April 18 in Preventing Chronic Disease.

Daniela B. Friedman, Ph.D., from the University of South Carolina in Columbia, and colleagues compared consumers' (4,728) and providers' (1,250) beliefs, practices, and information sources related to maintaining health and . Ten questions from Porter Novelli's HealthStyles survey and six questions from their DocStyles survey were analyzed.

The researchers found that 76 percent of consumers considered their health to be good or very good and 73.4 percent were concerned or very concerned about the possibility that their memory may worsen with age. Concern was higher among women compared to men and white consumers compared to black and Hispanic consumers. Participants reported believing that intellectual stimulation (86.6 percent), physical activity (82.6 percent), and a healthy diet (82.5 percent) prevented or delayed . Providers reported advising physical activity (85.9 percent), (80.3 percent), and social involvement (67.4 percent) to patients to reduce cognitive impairment risk, though few consumers (7.8 percent) reported receiving this information from providers. Consumers reported learning about memory maintenance strategies from television (50.1 percent), magazines (44.1 percent), and newspapers (33.7 percent).

"Findings suggest a need to examine and assess and to better understand patient-provider communication about cognitive functioning," the authors write.

More information: Full Text

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Cardiac disease linked to higher risk of mental impairment

Jan 28, 2013

Cardiac disease is associated with increased risk of mild cognitive impairment such as problems with language, thinking and judgment—particularly among women with heart disease, a Mayo Clinic study shows. Known as nonamnestic ...

'Eating more protein' strategy helps women lose weight

May 11, 2013

(HealthDay)—Women who report "eating more protein" as a weight loss strategy achieve weight loss over two years, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education an ...

Recommended for you

Study links enzyme to autistic behaviors

19 hours ago

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. It is the most common ...

A new cause of mental disease?

Jul 23, 2014

Astrocytes, the cells that make the background of the brain and support neurons, might be behind mental disorders such as depression and schizophrenia, according to new research by a Portuguese team from ...

Molecular basis of age-related memory loss explained

Jul 22, 2014

From telephone numbers to foreign vocabulary, our brains hold a seemingly endless supply of information. However, as we are getting older, our ability to learn and remember new things declines. A team of ...

The neurochemistry of addiction

Jul 22, 2014

We've all heard the term "addictive personality," and many of us know individuals who are consistently more likely to take the extra drink or pill that puts them over the edge. But the specific balance of ...

User comments