Doc: Face transplant patient making good progress

May 27, 2013

A surgeon who operated on Poland's first face transplant patient says the man is already practicing swallowing and making sounds.

The 33-year-old man received a skin-and-bone transplant on May 15, three weeks after losing his nose, and cheeks in a workplace accident. say it was the world's fastest time frame for such an operation.

Dr. Maciej Grajek told The Associated Press on Monday the man is practicing to swallow , has gotten out of bed a few times this weekend, communicates through writing and can make sounds when his tracheotomy tube—which helps him breathe— is closed for a moment. Grajek called that "very good progress."

The patient remains in isolation to guard against infections.

Explore further: Turkey: doctors perform quadruple limb transplant

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