Eyelash extension adhesives may cause bad reactions

Eyelash extension adhesives may cause bad reactions
Infections and allergies from cosmetic procedure can damage eyes or cause swelling, loss of eyelashes.

(HealthDay)—For those who aren't born with long, fluttery eyelashes, cosmetic extensions can help achieve that often sought-after look. But eye experts warn that the adhesives used to apply these eyelash extensions can cause allergies and infections.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) warns that among the potential dangers associated with cosmetic eyelash extensions and the adhesives used to apply them are infections of the cornea and eyelid, permanent or temporary loss of eyelashes, and eyelid swelling.

The academy said that a recent Consumer Reports article details the cases of several patients who suffered infections and to -based adhesives used with eyelash extensions.

The AAO said consumers should use caution if they're considering eyelash extensions and offered the following advice:

  • Only go to an aesthetician who is certified and working at a reputable business.

  • Ensure that adequate and proper hygiene is practiced by the aesthetician.

  • Ask about the eyelash adhesive ingredients before getting the extensions applied.

People who develop an infection, allergic reaction or other irritation after using eyelash extensions or other eye products should immediately seek medical attention from an —a doctor who specializes in the treatment of eye conditions, the experts noted in an AAO news release.

More information: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration offers tips for the safe use of eye cosmetics.

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