Feds fight morning-after pill age ruling in NY

(AP)—Department of Justice lawyers have again asked a federal appeals court in New York to delay lifting age restrictions and prescription requirements on an emergency contraceptive popularly known as the morning-after pill.

The lawyers filed court papers Friday seeking to delay implementation of a judge's April ruling lifting restrictions on medications including those sold under the brand name .

The stage has been set for another court showdown between President Barack Obama's administration and women's health activists over access to the contraceptive.

The 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals is scheduled to begin considering Tuesday whether to allow the judge's ruling to take effect immediately or delay it while further appeals are pending.

Lawyers for a group of women and parents say any further delay in access to the medication would harm "countless" women.

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praos
1 / 5 (3) May 26, 2013
No age limit means that a 5y old could pop at once 100 hormonal pills. So much about womans' health.
rwinners
1 / 5 (1) May 26, 2013
Actually, the age limit is now 15, I believe, and does not require a prescription.
BTW, a 5 year old could also pop 100 acetaminophen caps which would be quite deadly. Why manufacture straw dogs?