Study: No higher cancer rate at Conn. Pratt plant

by Stephen Singer

(AP)—Researchers examining the incidence of brain cancer at jet engine manufacturer Pratt & Whitney in Connecticut say they have found no statistically significant elevations in the rate of cancer among workers.

The researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Illinois at Chicago said Thursday they identified 723 workers diagnosed with tumors between 1976 and 2004 at the United Technologies Corp. subsidiary. The tumors were malignant, benign or unspecified and included 277 cases of .

The researchers also reviewed 11 chemical or physical agents on the basis of known or suspected carcinogenic potential that could affect the central nervous system or other organs.

The results end an 11-year, $12 million study commissioned by Pratt & Whitney and overseen by the state Department of Public Health.

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