Self-medicating with alcohol linked to later dependence

Self-medicating with alcohol linked to later dependence
Use of alcohol to self-medicate mood symptoms correlates with increased odds of subsequent alcohol dependence and persistence of dependence, according to a study published online May 1 in JAMA Psychiatry.

(HealthDay)—Use of alcohol to self-medicate mood symptoms correlates with increased odds of subsequent alcohol dependence and persistence of dependence, according to a study published online May 1 in JAMA Psychiatry.

Rosa M. Crum, M.D., M.H.S., from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and colleagues conducted a prospective study using face-to-face interviews among 43,093 adults surveyed in 2001 and 2002, 34,653 of whom were re-interviewed in 2004 and 2005. The authors sought to examine whether self-medication of mood symptoms with alcohol correlated with the probability of subsequent onset and persistence of .

The researchers found that alcohol self-medication of mood symptoms correlated with increased odds of incident alcohol dependence and persistence of dependence at follow-up (adjusted odds ratio, 3.10 and 3.45, respectively). The population-attributable fractions were 11.9 and 30.6 percent, respectively, for incident dependence and persistent dependence. Analyses were stratified by age, sex, race/ethnicity, severity of mood symptoms, and treatment history for mood symptoms.

"Drinking to alleviate mood symptoms is associated with the development of alcohol dependence and its once dependence develops," the authors write. "Drinking to self-medicate may be a potential target for prevention and efforts aimed at reducing the occurrence of alcohol dependence."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Alcohol abusers' depression often related to drinking

Feb 12, 2013

For problem drinkers, bouts of depressive symptoms are often the direct result of their heavy alcohol intake, according to a study in the March issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

Recommended for you

Could summer camp be the key to world peace?

6 hours ago

According to findings from a new study by University of Chicago Booth School of Business Professor Jane Risen, and Chicago Booth doctoral student Juliana Schroeder, it may at least be a start.

Gender disparities in cognition will not diminish

Jul 28, 2014

The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, investigated the extent to which improvements in living conditions and educational opportunities over a person's life affect cognitive abilities and th ...

Facial features are the key to first impressions

Jul 28, 2014

A new study by researchers in the Department of Psychology at the University of York shows that it is possible to accurately predict first impressions using measurements of physical features in everyday images of faces, such ...

User comments