Less sleep associated with increased risk of crashes for young drivers

A study by Alexandra L. C. Martiniuk, M.Sc, Ph.D., of The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, Australia, and colleagues suggests less sleep per night is associated with a significant increase in the risk for motor vehicle crashes for young drivers. (Online First)

Questionnaire responses were analyzed from 19,327 newly licensed drivers from 17 to 24 years old who held a first-stage provisional license between June 2003 and December 2004. Researchers also analyzed licensing and police-reported crash data, with an average of 2 years of follow up.

On average, individuals who reported sleeping 6 or fewer hours per night had an increased risk for crash compared with those who reported sleeping more than 6 hours. Less weekend sleep was significantly associated with an increased risk for run-off-. Crashes for individuals who had less sleep per night (on average and on weekends) were significantly more likely to occur between 8 p.m. and 6 a.m.

"This provides rationale for governments and to address sleep-related crashes among young drivers," the study concludes.

More information: JAMA Pediatr. Published online May 20, 2013. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.1429

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Neonatal vitamin K refusal tied to nonimmunization

Aug 20, 2014

(HealthDay)—While neonatal vitamin K refusal is rare, parents who refuse vitamin K are less likely to immunize their child, according to a study published online Aug. 18 in Pediatrics.

Teen sleeplessness piles on risk for obesity

Aug 20, 2014

Teenagers who don't get enough sleep may wake up to worse consequences than nodding off during chemistry class. According to new research, risk of being obese by age 21 was 20 percent higher among 16-year-olds who got less ...

Researchers show economic disparities impact infant health

Aug 20, 2014

Women who are poor experience higher cortisol levels in pregnancy and give birth to infants with elevated levels of the stress hormone, putting them at greater risk for serious disease later in life, according to a new research ...

User comments