More research on exercise for adolescent scoliosis is needed

More research on exercise for adolescent scoliosis is needed
A recent Cochrane review concluded that there is a lack of high-quality evidence on the efficacy of scoliosis-specific exercise in adolescents with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, according to research published in the June 15 issue of Spine.

(HealthDay)—A recent Cochrane review concluded that there is a lack of high-quality evidence on the efficacy of scoliosis-specific exercise (SSE) in adolescents with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), according to research published in the June 15 issue of Spine.

Michele Romano, P.T., of the Italian Scientific Spine Institute in Milan, and colleagues conducted a systematic review to evaluate the efficacy of SSE in AIS. Data from a total of 154 patients involved in two studies—a randomized, controlled study and a prospective, controlled, cohort study—were analyzed.

The researchers found low-quality evidence from the randomized study that the addition of exercises increased the efficacy of other conservative treatments. Significant differences were observed in reductions of the thoracic curve (mean difference, 9.00) and the lumbar curve (mean difference, 8.00). Very low-quality evidence from the showed that SSEs incorporated into an reduced brace prescription (risk ratio, 0.24; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.06 to 1.04), compared with usual physical therapy consisting of different kinds of general exercises prescribed by individual physical therapists.

"More randomized controlled trials are needed to clarify the real role of SSEs as a treatment modality for mild to moderate AIS compared with no treatment," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Little evidence for prediction rules for low back pain

May 17, 2013

(HealthDay)—Few randomized clinical trials have been done to assess clinical prediction rules for patients with lower back pain, and the trials that have been done are of low quality and do not provide ...

Self-image worse for teens with untreated scoliosis

May 13, 2013

(HealthDay)—Adolescents with untreated adolescent idiopathic scoliosis report worse pain and worse self-image than unaffected adolescents, although the difference is clinically significant only for self-image, ...

Spine education seems ineffective in pain prevention

Dec 10, 2012

(HealthDay)—Educational interventions, mainly focused on a biomechanical/biomedical model, do not seem to be effective in preventing low back pain, according to a review published in the December issue ...

Recommended for you

Sierra Leone reaches final day of Ebola lockdown

1 hour ago

Frustrated residents complained of food shortages in some neighborhoods of Sierra Leone's capital on Sunday as the country reached the third and final day of a sweeping, unprecedented lockdown designed to ...

Sierra Leone faces criticism over Ebola shutdown

Sep 20, 2014

Sierra Leone began the second day of a 72-hour nationwide shutdown aimed at containing the spread of the deadly Ebola virus on Saturday amid criticism that the action was a poorly planned publicity stunt.

Presence of peers ups health workers' hand hygiene

Sep 19, 2014

(HealthDay)—The presence of other health care workers improves hand hygiene adherence, according to a study published in the October issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

Sierra Leone streets deserted as shutdown begins

Sep 19, 2014

Sierra Leone's normally chaotic capital resembled a ghost town on Friday as residents were confined to their homes for the start of a three-day lockdown aimed at halting the deadly Ebola epidemic.

User comments