Bipartisan recommendations can strengthen health system

Bipartisan recommendations can strengthen health system
Leaders of the Bipartisan Policy Center Health Care Cost Containment Initiative have developed a series of recommendations to strengthen the U.S. health care system, according to a sounding board piece published online June 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

(HealthDay)—Leaders of the Bipartisan Policy Center Health Care Cost Containment Initiative have developed a series of recommendations to strengthen the U.S. health care system, according to a sounding board piece published online June 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Thomas Daschle, and colleagues from the Bipartisan Policy Center in Washington, D.C., have developed a comprehensive set of recommendations to improve quality, reduce waste, and control costs in an effort to strengthen the U.S. .

The authors provide key recommendations related to four areas of the health care system. Medicare should be improved and enhanced by promoting quality and value through Medicare Networks, an improved version of accountable care organizations. In addition, a standardized minimum benefit should be established for Medicare Advantage plans, and protection should be provided against catastrophic costs. Secondly, tax policy should be reformed to encourage efficiency and competition by replacing the "Cadillac tax" on high-cost health insurance plans and providing guidance for private-sector entities seeking to form integrated, coordinated care delivery systems. Quality, prevention, and wellness should be prioritized, with adoption of effective quality metrics encouraged and a focus toward prevention as a means for improving health and containing cost. Adoption of a streamlined and coordinated strategy to deliver services to those with dual eligibility is suggested as one way to empower and encourage states to improve care and contain costs.

"We believe that the vision and recommendations articulated in our bipartisan report, if enacted together, would help to put our national system, as well as our economic outlook, on a more sustainable, healthful path for the future," the authors write.

More information: Full Text

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Independent payment advisory board's future questioned

Jun 04, 2013

(HealthDay)—Established as a part of the efforts of Affordable Care Act (ACA) to contain health care costs, the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB) has been surrounded by controversy, and still has ...

CMS reports on progress toward improved health care

Mar 05, 2013

(HealthDay)—Considerable progress has already been made toward improving the quality and delivery of health care, according to a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) bulletin published online ...

CDC releases modified contraception recommendations

Jun 20, 2013

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued modified recommendations for health care providers regarding the safe and effective use of contraceptive methods; the report, "U.S. ...

Recommended for you

Asia's rising tobacco epidemic

1 hour ago

Smoke-filled bars and packed cancer wards reflect decades of neglect of no-smoking policies in Asia, where both high- and low-income countries are belatedly waking up to a growing tobacco-related health ...

Study: Americans endure unwanted care near death

12 hours ago

Americans suffer needless discomfort and undergo unwanted and costly care as they die, in part because of a medical system ruled by "perverse incentives" for aggressive care and not enough conversation about what people want, ...

Failed Medicare payments law remains relevant

12 hours ago

In a new commentary in the journal JAMA Surgery, Dr. Eli Adashi recounts what he and other advocates saw as merits of the originally bipartisan Sustainable Growth Rate Repeal and Medicare Provider Paymen ...

User comments