Corticosteroid injections may help injured NFL players return to play sooner

Corticosteroid injections may speed-up the return time for National Football League (NFL) players suffering high ankle sprains, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL. Players treated with these injections typically returned 40% faster or approximately 10 days earlier than those not receiving the same treatment.

"After examining players with stable high ankle sprains over an eight-year period, we discovered those treated with corticosteroid injections returned to play within an average 15 days, as compared to 25 days for those not treated similarly," noted Alfred A. Mansour, MD, from UT-Houston Orthopaedics in Houston, Texas. "For high-level athletes such as NFL players, returning to play 10 days sooner can have a significant impact personally and for the team."

The study examined 31 players from two NFL teams, with 13 players receiving a within 72 hours of an . All players involved in the study went through a standard non-operative rehabilitation program, including crutches, weight-bearing activity as tolerated, NSAIDs treatment, and a progressive return to play training.

"While previous research explores the extended recovery involved with these injuries, our data offers a new treatment option that may be more effective for NFL players," noted Mansour. "Further research can help confirm this, though we are excited to discover ways to help athletes at the professional level."

The authors reported no complications in players treated with the corticosteroid injections.

Provided by American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study shows lace-up ankle braces keep athletes on the court

Jul 08, 2011

Lace-up ankle braces can reduce the occurrence of acute ankle injuries in male and female high school basketball players, according to research presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting ...

U of A research leads to enhanced CFL concussion guidelines

Jun 05, 2013

Research from the University of Alberta shows CFL players are more likely to value medical tests after concussions compared to university-level players. But the professional athletes were more apt to incorrectly believe it's ...

Recommended for you

Study reveals state of crisis in Canadian foster care system

21 hours ago

A new study of foster care in Canada led by a researcher at Western University reveals a shrinking number of foster care providers are available across the country to care for a growing number of children with increasingly ...

Researchers prove the benefits of persimmons for diet

23 hours ago

Alba Mir and Ana Domingo, researchers from the Department of Analytical Chemistry of the University of Valencia, under the supervision of professors Miguel de la Guardia and Maria Luisa Cervera, from the same department, ...

Hand blenders used for cooking can emit persistent chemicals

23 hours ago

Eight out of twelve tested models of hand blenders are leaking chlorinated paraffins when used according to the suppliers' instructions. This is revealed in a report from Stockholm University where researchers analyzed a ...

User comments