Eating eggs is not linked to high cholesterol in adolescents

Although in the late 20th century it was maintained that eating more than two eggs a week could increase cholesterol, in recent years experts have begun to refute this myth. Now, a new study has found that eating more eggs is not associated with higher serum cholesterol in adolescents, regardless of how much physical activity they do.

A new study led by researchers at the University of Granada has analysed the link between egg intake in adolescents and the main risk factors for developing cardiovascular diseases, such as lipid profile, excess body fat, and high blood pressure.

As Alberto Soriano Maldonado, primary author of the study, explains to SINC: "Health professionals traditionally insisted that eating eggs increased , so in recent decades there has been a tendency to restrict intake championed by various public health organisations."

However, the most recent research suggests that increased serum cholesterol is more affected by intake of saturated fats and - present in red meat, industrial baked goods, etc. - than by the amount of cholesterol in the diet.

The results of this article, part of the European study HELENA involving nine countries, demonstrated that eating larger amounts of egg is neither linked to higher serum cholesterol nor to worse in adolescents, regardless of their levels of physical activity.

"The conclusions, published in the journal Nutrición Hospitalaria, confirm recent studies in healthy adults that suggest that an intake of up to seven eggs a week is not associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases," notes Soriano.

As a result, the authors suggest reviewing for adolescents, although they add that it would be useful to conduct similar research on a sample group with higher egg intake.

"Egg is a cheap food that is rich in very high-quality proteins, minerals, folates and B vitamins. Thus it can provide a large quantity of nutrients necessary for optimum development in adolescents," according to the researcher.

Banishing the egg myth

In 1973, the American Heart Association recommended limiting egg intake to a maximum of three per week, an idea that was accepted by health experts for years.

However, although the majority of foods rich in cholesterol are usually also rich in saturated fats, a medium-size egg contains 200 milligrams of cholesterol but has more unsaturated fats than saturated fats and only has 70 calories.

More information: DOI:10.3305/nh.2013.28.3.6392

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Moebius
3 / 5 (8) Jul 19, 2013
Anyone that thinks eating eggs is bad is a maroon. Just more cholesterol hysteria.
Shootist
1 / 5 (5) Jul 21, 2013
Salt, fat, sugar, cyclamates, peak oil and nuclear winter: Crackpots been lyin' for decades.
neversaidit
1 / 5 (1) Jul 22, 2013
20 eggs a week for three years, cholesterol was good.
tekram
1 / 5 (1) Jul 22, 2013
Notice the current study is base on healthy adolescents. Other studies have shown that "with aging, plaque builds up gradually in the arteries of Canadians, and egg yolks make it build up faster - about two-thirds as much as smoking... In diabetics, an egg a day increases coronary risk by two to five-fold"
"Egg yolk consumption almost as bad as smoking when it comes to atherosclerosis"
http://medicalxpr...sis.html
tekram
1 / 5 (1) Jul 22, 2013
In the case of eggs, the chain of events starts when the body digests lecithin, breaking it into its constituent parts, including the chemical choline. Intestinal bacteria metabolize choline and release a substance that the liver converts to a chemical known as TMAO, for trimethylamine N-oxide. High levels of TMAO in the blood are linked to increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

To show the effect of eggs on TMAO, Dr. Hazen asked volunteers to eat two hard-boiled eggs. They ended up with more TMAO in their blood. But if they first took an antibiotic to wipe out intestinal bacteria, eggs did not have that effect.

To see the effects of TMAO on cardiovascular risk, the investigators studied 4,000 people who had been seen at the Cleveland Clinic. The more TMAO in their blood, the more likely they were to have a heart attack or stroke in the ensuing three years.
PeterD
1 / 5 (2) Jul 22, 2013
I am 74, and have eaten 2 eggs, or more, a day for most of my life. I am perfectly healthy, and my cholesterol has never been over 175.