Pre-pregnancy diabetes increases risk of MRSA among new mothers

July 1, 2013

Pregnant women with diabetes are more than three times as likely as mothers without diabetes to become infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) before hospital discharge, according to a study in the July issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

The study aim was to investigate the extent to which pre-pregnancy and are associated with MRSA infection. Researchers found that pre-pregnancy diabetes was associated with increased risk of MRSA following delivery, but found no association between MRSA and gestational diabetes.

Researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles analyzed more than 3.5 million delivery-related hospital admissions from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), a system that accounts for 20 percent of in the United States. Of these admissions, 5.3 percent of mothers (185,514 women) acquired diabetes during their pregnancy (gestational diabetes) and nearly one percent (28,939) had pre-pregnancy diabetes. The researchers identified 563 cases of invasive MRSA among the mothers following delivery. To the extent that infection site information was available, the most frequent sources of infection were skin (30.9 percent), urinary tract (6.4 percent), other genitourinary sites (5.2 percent), (3.0 percent) and septicemia (2.0 percent).

"When combined with previous research showing increased risk of certain infections in diabetic persons, it seems likely that diabetic women are at increased risk of MRSA infection compared with other women admitted for delivery of an infant," conclude the authors. "As we wait for further research on this topic, it might seem prudent for hospitals to be vigilant about possible MRSA risk among diabetic women in labor and delivery."

MRSA is a type of that is resistant to certain antibiotics and is an important cause of illness and sometimes death, especially among patients who have been hospitalized.

Explore further: MRSA colonization in groin tied to clinical infections

More information: "Diabetes and early postpartum methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in US hospitals," by Andrea M. Parriott and Onyebuchi A. Arah appears in the American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 41, Issue 7 (July 2013).

Related Stories

MRSA colonization in groin tied to clinical infections

March 26, 2013

(HealthDay)—Groin colonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) leads to an increased risk of developing active MRSA infection later among HIV-infected patients, according to a study published in the ...

High prevalence of drug-resistant MRSA found in nursing homes

February 11, 2013

While most infection control measures are focused on hospitals, a new study points to the need for more targeted interventions to prevent the spread of drug-resistant bugs in nursing homes as community-associated strains ...

Recommended for you

Zika virus infection alters human and viral RNA

October 20, 2016

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that Zika virus infection leads to modifications of both viral and human genetic material. These modifications—chemical tags known as ...

Food-poisoning bacteria may be behind Crohn's disease

October 19, 2016

People who retain a particular bacterium in their gut after a bout of food poisoning may be at an increased risk of developing Crohn's disease later in life, according to a new study led by researchers at McMaster University.

Neurodevelopmental model of Zika may provide rapid answers

October 19, 2016

A newly published study from researchers working in collaboration with the Regenerative Bioscience Center at the University of Georgia demonstrates fetal death and brain damage in early chick embryos similar to microcephaly—a ...

Scientists uncover new facets of Zika-related birth defects

October 17, 2016

In a study that could one day help eliminate the tragic birth defects caused by Zika virus, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have elucidated how the virus attacks the brains of newborns, ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.