Depression and nocturia may be bidirectionally linked

Depression and nocturia may be bidirectionally linked
There may be a bidirectional association between depression and nocturia, according to a review published in the September issue of The Journal of Urology.

(HealthDay)—There may be a bidirectional association between depression and nocturia, according to a review published in the September issue of The Journal of Urology.

Benjamin N. Breyer, M.D., from the University of California in San Francisco, and colleagues conducted a literature review to identify abstracts and original, review, and editorial articles on nocturia and , specifically depression and anxiety.

The researchers observed a strong association between nocturia and depression/anxiety based on cross-sectional (level 3) data. A single prospective study found a unidirectional relationship with depression leading to nocturia. Nocturia posed a greater risk for depression in men than in women. The effect of serotonin reuptake inhibitors on nocturia demonstrated conflicting results.

"Practicing clinicians should consider administering a brief self-administered scale to assess for depression in patients with nocturia," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed to the pharmaceutical industry.

More information: Abstract
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