ER visits related to use of CNS stimulants up from '05 to '11

ER visits related to use of CNS stimulants up from '05 to '11
From 2005 to 2011, the number of emergency department visits related to nonmedical use of central nervous system stimulants increased about four-fold among 18- to 34-year-olds, according to a report published Aug. 8 by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

(HealthDay)—From 2005 to 2011, the number of emergency department visits related to nonmedical use of central nervous system (CNS) stimulants increased about four-fold among 18- to 34-year-olds, according to a report published Aug. 8 by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Researchers from SAMHSA used data from the Drug Abuse Warning Network to assess trends in emergency department visits related to nonmedical use of CNS stimulants among adults aged 18 to 34 years.

According to the report, from 2005 to 2011, the number of emergency department visits related to nonmedical use of CNS simulants increased from 5,605 to 22,949. There was also an increase in the number of emergency department visits involving nonmedical CNS stimulant use and alcohol. Each year, about 30 percent of the visits involving nonmedical CNS stimulant use involved alcohol.

"Nonmedical use of any drug, even an over-the-counter drug, can be dangerous, but these CNS stimulants can potentially cause significant and lasting harm, including heart problems and addiction," Elinore F. McCance-Katz, M.D., Ph.D., SAMHSA's chief medical officer, said in a statement. "We must raise awareness of this and do everything possible to prevent it."

More information: More Information

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

ER visits linked to ADHD meds up sharply

Jan 25, 2013

(HealthDay)—U.S. emergency department visits involving attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drugs more than doubled from 2005 to 2010, with the largest hike occurring among adults, says a new ...

Alcohol use down, drug use up among pregnant women

Aug 01, 2013

(HealthDay)—From 2000 to 2010 there was a decrease in alcohol abuse, but an increase in drug use, among pregnant women, according to a report published July 25 by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health ...

ER visits tied to ambien on the rise

May 01, 2013

(HealthDay)—There has been a dramatic increase in the number of emergency-room visits related to sleep medications such as Ambien, according to a new U.S. study.

Health of nation reviewed with focus on emergency care

Jun 03, 2013

(HealthDay)—Recent trends in the health of the nation are described, with particular focus on emergency care, in the 36th annual report published by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) and ...

Recommended for you

Demographics impact family physicians' care of children

Sep 12, 2014

(HealthDay)—Demographic and geographic factors influence whether family physicians provide care for children, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Estimate: 3 in 10 NFL retirees face cognitive woes (Update)

Sep 12, 2014

Nearly three in 10 former NFL players will develop at least moderate neurocognitive problems and qualify for payments under the proposed $765 million concussion settlement, according to data prepared for ex-players' lawyers ...

Physician describes impact of malpractice suit

Sep 12, 2014

(HealthDay)—A family doctor who was involved in a malpractice suit describes the impact on her practice of medicine in an article published online in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Me ...

Report outlines 'must-have' sexual health services for men

Sep 12, 2014

(Medical Xpress)—Compared with women, American men have worse access to reproductive and sexual health care, research shows, a disparity fueled in part by the lack of standard clinical guidelines on the types and timing ...

New report finds a healthy well-being among Chinese children

Sep 12, 2014

A new study of children's well-being in Shanghai finds that first-graders are socially and emotionally healthy, with most performing average or above average academically. The study, by the New York University-East China ...

User comments