Gene variants linked to obesity

Gene variants linked to obesity
Variants of a gene are associated with overweight and obesity in psychiatric patients taking drugs that induce weight gain, as well in the general population, according to a study published online Aug. 7 in JAMA Psychiatry.

(HealthDay)—Variants of a gene are associated with overweight and obesity in psychiatric patients taking drugs that induce weight gain, as well in the general population, according to a study published online Aug. 7 in JAMA Psychiatry.

Eva Choong, Pharm.D., Ph.D., from Lausanne University Hospital in Prilly, Switzerland, and colleagues examined whether three CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) polymorphisms were associated with (BMI) or fat mass in psychiatric outpatients taking weight gain-inducing psychotropic drugs and in the general population.

The researchers found that only rs3746266A>G was significantly associated with BMI in the psychiatric patients. Among 226 patients not taking other weight gain-inducing drugs, G allele carriers had a significant 1.81-kg/m² lower BMI than non-carriers. Women under 45 years of age showed the strongest association, with G allele carriers having a 3.87-kg/m² lower BMI than non-carriers, which accounted for 9 percent of BMI variance. Among 123,865 members of the general population, rs6510997C>T was significantly associated with lower BMI. In an independent 5,338 members of the general population, the T allele was significantly associated with lower fat mass, particularly among .

"These findings suggest that CRTC1 contributes to the genetics of in psychiatric patients and the general population," Choong and colleagues conclude.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical companies.

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