Gene variants linked to obesity

August 9, 2013
Gene variants linked to obesity
Variants of a gene are associated with overweight and obesity in psychiatric patients taking drugs that induce weight gain, as well in the general population, according to a study published online Aug. 7 in JAMA Psychiatry.

(HealthDay)—Variants of a gene are associated with overweight and obesity in psychiatric patients taking drugs that induce weight gain, as well in the general population, according to a study published online Aug. 7 in JAMA Psychiatry.

Eva Choong, Pharm.D., Ph.D., from Lausanne University Hospital in Prilly, Switzerland, and colleagues examined whether three CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) polymorphisms were associated with (BMI) or fat mass in psychiatric outpatients taking weight gain-inducing psychotropic drugs and in the general population.

The researchers found that only rs3746266A>G was significantly associated with BMI in the psychiatric patients. Among 226 patients not taking other weight gain-inducing drugs, G allele carriers had a significant 1.81-kg/m² lower BMI than non-carriers. Women under 45 years of age showed the strongest association, with G allele carriers having a 3.87-kg/m² lower BMI than non-carriers, which accounted for 9 percent of BMI variance. Among 123,865 members of the general population, rs6510997C>T was significantly associated with lower BMI. In an independent 5,338 members of the general population, the T allele was significantly associated with lower fat mass, particularly among .

"These findings suggest that CRTC1 contributes to the genetics of in psychiatric patients and the general population," Choong and colleagues conclude.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical companies.

Explore further: BMI and lean body mass decline after allogeneic HSCT

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

BMI and lean body mass decline after allogeneic HSCT

October 4, 2012

(HealthDay)—In survivors of childhood hematologic malignancies who have received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT), body mass index (BMI) decreases significantly, mainly due to a reduction in ...

Gene-environment interaction ups risk of preeclampsia

December 10, 2012

(HealthDay)—A genetic variant, AGT2R, in mothers, fathers, and neonates is associated with a significantly increased risk of preeclampsia in mothers with a body mass index (BMI) of 25 kg/m² or more, according to a study ...

Higher BMI increases risk of gallstones, especially in women

July 11, 2013

New research reveals a causal association between elevated body mass index (BMI) and increased risk of gallstone disease. Results published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, ...

Recommended for you

A metabolic master switch underlying human obesity

August 19, 2015

Obesity is one of the biggest public health challenges of the 21st century. Affecting more than 500 million people worldwide, obesity costs at least $200 billion each year in the United States alone, and contributes to potentially ...

Scientists probe obesity's ties to breast cancer risk

August 20, 2015

Obesity is a well-known risk factor for breast cancer, but researchers haven't figured out what connects the two. A new study suggests the link may be due to a change in breast tissue structure, which might promote breast ...

Can a new drug brown the fat and trim the obese person?

May 28, 2015

New research has found that a variant of a drug used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension prompts weight loss in obese mice. Among mice fed a high-fat diet, those who did not get the medication became obese while medicated ...

Changing stem cell structure may help fight obesity

February 17, 2015

The research, conducted at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), found that a slight regulation in the length of primary cilia, small hair-like projections found on most cells, prevented the production of fat cells from ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.