Italian study shows gender disparity in diabetes care

Italian study shows gender disparity in diabetes care
Compared to Italian men, women in Italy receive a poorer quality of diabetes care, and although difficulty attaining an ideal low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level appears to be mostly related to pathophysiological factors, patient and physician attitudes play an important role in other process measures and outcomes, according to a study published online July 8 in Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay)—Compared to Italian men, women in Italy receive a poorer quality of diabetes care, and although difficulty attaining an ideal low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level appears to be mostly related to pathophysiological factors, patient and physician attitudes play an important role in other process measures and outcomes, according to a study published online July 8 in Diabetes Care.

Maria Chiara Rossi, from Consorzio Mario Negri Sud in Santa Maria Imbaro, Italy, and colleagues utilized to evaluate quality-of-care indicators for clinical data collected in 2009 for 415,294 patients (45.3 percent women) from 236 diabetes outpatient centers in Italy. Both intercenter variability and gender-specific differences in monitoring for specific parameters, reaching clinical outcomes, and drug treatment were investigated.

The researchers found that despite receiving , women were significantly more likely than men to have glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) >9.0 percent (odds ratio, 1.14). In addition, they were significantly more likely to have LDL-C ?130 mg/dL, in spite of lipid-lowering treatment (odds ratio, 1.42); and were significantly more likely to have ?30 kg/m² (odds ratio, 1.50). Foot and eye complications were less likely to be monitored in women. The percentage of men reaching the LDL-C target was higher than women in 99 percent of centers. Similarly, the proportion of patients reaching the HbA1c target was higher in men in 80 percent of the centers. There were no differences in blood pressure.

"These findings underline the need for diversifying the care and specializing the support provided to men and women based on sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics," the authors write.

The study was partially funded by LifeScan and Eli Lilly.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Cancer prevalence higher with long duration of diabetes

Jan 24, 2013

(HealthDay)—Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have a greater prevalence of cancer with longer diabetes duration and with insulin use, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in Diabetes Care.

Recommended for you

Economic burden of prediabetes up 74 percent over five years

Nov 20, 2014

The economic burden of diabetes in America continues to climb, exceeding more than $322 billion in excess medical costs and lost productivity in 2012, or more than $1,000 for every American, according to a study being published ...

Gynoid fat resists metabolic risks of obesity

Nov 19, 2014

(HealthDay)—The differences in the developmental profiles of upper-body and lower-body fat depots may explain their opposing associations with obesity-related metabolic disease, according to research published ...

Treating diabetes one meal at a time

Nov 19, 2014

Recent estimates project that as many as one in three American adults will have diabetes in 2050. The American Diabetes Association observes November as American Diabetes Month, and this year's theme is America ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.