NYC to state top court: Review big-soda ban ruling

(AP)—New York City is asking the state's highest court to take up the city's effort to stop many eateries from selling super-sized, sugary drinks.

The request was made public Monday. The city asks the Court of Appeals to review a lower-court ruling that struck down the measure last week.

That decision says the city Board of Health exceeded its authority by putting a 16-ounce size limit on high-calorie and soft drinks. The cap was to apply to restaurants, stadiums and many other places.

The new filing isn't a surprise. Mayor Michael Bloomberg had indicated it was coming.

It cites the toll of obesity-related disease. It also says the high court needs to resolve "important issues" about the health board's authority.

The American Beverage Association did not immediately comment.

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Court hears arguments on NYC's big soda ban

Jun 11, 2013

A state appeals court is considering whether to allow New York City to ban oversized sodas and other large sugary drinks at city restaurants as part of its war on diabetes and obesity.

Recommended for you

Uruguay opens bidding for marijuana plots

54 minutes ago

Uruguay, the first country to fully legalize the production, sale and distribution of marijuana, called for bids Friday from private growers who want to farm cannabis in a public field.

Patient-centered medical homes reduce costs

18 hours ago

The patient-centered medical home (PCMH), introduced in 2007, is a model of health care that emphasizes personal relationships, team delivery of care, coordination across specialties and care settings, quality ...

New mums still excessively sleepy after four months

19 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—New mums are being urged to be cautious about returning to work too quickly, after a QUT study found one in two were still excessively sleepy four months after giving birth.

It's time to address the health of men around the world

20 hours ago

All over the world, men die younger than women and do worse on a host of health indicators, yet policy makers rarely focus on this "men's health gap" or adopt programs aimed at addressing it, according to an international ...

User comments