A vision exam for mice

How can one use simple means to investigate the visual abilities of animals? This question is being pursued by the research group of Dr. Thomas Münch at the Centre for Integrative Neuroscience at the University of Tübingen. Dr. Münch is, among other things, interested in the restoration of lost visual function. Mice can suffer from similar diseases of blindness as humans, so that new therapeutic approaches can be developed by doing research on mice.

Since the treated animals cannot tell us how well they can see, one attempts to draw conclusions about visual abilities from behavioral observations. Animals are commonly trained with food to display a certain behavior in response to color or pattern. This experimental approach, however, is very time-consuming, and training blind animals is nearly impossible. The researchers therefore take advantage of a simple reflex: the optokinetic reflex. This reflex can easily be noticed on a train ride: when observing the landscape from a moving train, the eyes periodically follow the passing landscape. This effect keeps the image of constant on the for a short while. This phenomenon occurs in most animals.

A new study published this week in the journal Behavioral Neuroscience is based on this effect. The of mice was examined using a chamber whose walls were made of four computer screens. The monitors showed a rotating striped pattern. This simulated movement of the environment triggered the optokinetic reflex and the mouse followed the pattern with its gaze – but only when the animal could recognize the striped pattern. This allows the visual performance of each individual animal to be determined. Just as the can make the displayed pattern finer during vision testing, so too can the displayed pattern be changed until the animal is no longer able to recognize it and subsequently fails the reflex test.

The utilization of the allows the contrast or resolution of the pattern to be changed in almost any way desired. For the study, doctoral candidate Boris Benkner has developed software that automatically evaluates the animal's behavior and can thus determine the visual ability of an animal in a short time. "In previous studies, it was necessary to tediously analyze each animal's behavior manually," said Benkner. "Our automated method is not only faster but also more objective, because the stripe pattern does also influence the observer when doing the analysis."

The senior author of the study, Thomas Münch, sees great potential in the newly developed method to evaluate new treatment strategies for blindness. "Currently, many new ways for treating blindness are being developed, ranging from dietary supplements to optogenetics to stem cell therapy" said Münch. "It is important to scrutinize these therapies from the beginning, to test if they really improve the of the treated animals."

More information: Benkner, B. et al. Characterizing Visual Performance in Mice: An Objective and Automated System Based on the Optokinetic Reflex, Behavioral Neuroscience, Online First Publication, Aug. 20, 2013. DOI: 10.1037/a0033944

Related Stories

Why evolutionarily ancient brain areas are important

date Nov 30, 2011

Structures in the midbrain that developed early in evolution can be responsible for functions in newborns which in adults are taken over by the cerebral cortex. New evidence for this theory has been found in the visual system ...

Dragonflies can see by switching 'on' and 'off'

date Aug 15, 2013

(Phys.org) —Researchers at the University of Adelaide have discovered a novel and complex visual circuit in a dragonfly's brain that could one day help to improve vision systems for robots.

See spot see

date Mar 02, 2013

(HealthDay)—It's a dog-see-dog world. With no sniffing involved, dogs can recognize the faces of other dogs among the faces of humans and other animal species, according to a new study.

Making a beeline for the nectar

date Jun 20, 2013

Bumblebees searching for nectar go for signposts on flowers rather than the bull's eye. A new study, by Levente Orbán and Catherine Plowright from the University of Ottawa in Canada, shows that the markings ...

Recommended for you

Altered pain processing in patients with cognitive impairment

date 8 hours ago

People with dementia and other forms of cognitive impairment (CI) have altered responses to pain, with many conditions associated with increased pain sensitivity, concludes a research review in Pain, the official publication of the ...

Changing activity in the ageing brain

date 12 hours ago

Normal ageing affects our ability to carry out complex cognitive tasks. But exactly how our brain functions change during this process is largely unknown. Now, researchers in Malaysia have demonstrated that ...

Networking neurons thrive in 3-D human 'organoid'

date 12 hours ago

A patient tormented by suicidal thoughts gives his psychiatrist a few strands of his hair. She derives stem cells from them to grow budding brain tissue harboring the secrets of his unique illness in a petri ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.