Women conceive naturally after IVF, study finds

Women whose infertility was initially diagnosed as unexplained were more than twice as likely as others with a specific infertility diagnosis to become pregnant naturally.

One in three women who have their first baby through infertility treatment, become pregnant again naturally within two years of their first birth, a new study has found.

A Monash University study, published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, was the first to examine the rates of unexpected conception in Australian women who had a first child through (ART).

The study of 236 women who had a baby through assisted reproductive treatments found 33 per cent of them conceived a second child naturally within two years of their first birth.

Women whose infertility was initially diagnosed as 'unexplained' were more than twice as likely as others with a specific infertility diagnosis to become pregnant naturally.

Lead researcher Dr Karen Wynter, from the Jean Hailes Research Unit at Monash University, said unexpected pregnancies in some of the women could be associated with undiagnosed such as .

"It is possible that some of the women had undiagnosed endometriosis and that might be why they were struggling the first time," Dr Wynter said.

''The pregnancy itself actually helps to alleviate some of the symptoms associated with endometriosis and the second pregnancy comes around easier.''

The women who became pregnant naturally were also more likely to have been in relationships for a shorter period of time.

''One possible explanation is that these women are having sex more frequently,'' Dr Wynter said.

More information: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ajo.12112/abstract

Related Stories

Endometriosis treatments lower ovarian cancer risk

Apr 11, 2013

A novel study shows women who undergo surgical treatment for endometriosis have a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer. According to results published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the ...

Timing crucial in achieving pregnancy

Sep 03, 2012

A survey of women seeking fertility assistance to become pregnant found most did not know which days of the menstrual cycle they were fertile and most likely to conceive.

Recommended for you

Prolonged, heavy bleeding during menopause is common

Apr 15, 2014

Women going through menopause most likely think of it as the time for an end to predictable monthly periods. Researchers at the University of Michigan say it's normal, however, for the majority of them to experience an increase ...

Italy IVF patient pregnant with wrong embryos

Apr 13, 2014

A woman who underwent fertility treatment at a clinic in Rome became pregnant with the twins of another couple after their embryos were mixed up, press reports said Sunday.

Abuse not tied to pain severity in chronic pelvic pain

Apr 11, 2014

(HealthDay)—A history of adolescent or adult abuse is not associated with pain severity, but is linked to pain-related disability and depression in women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP), according to a study ...

User comments