Chronic inflammation linked to less likelihood of healthy aging

Chronic exposure to high levels of interleukin-6 was associated with a significantly lower likelihood of healthy aging, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Interleukin-6 is marker of inflammation, and has been linked to a variety of age-related diseases, such as diabetes, heart disease and cognitive decline. Diet, chronic disease, smoking and other factors can cause inflammation. However, studies on chronic inflammation have generally looked at inflammation at only one point in time.

Researchers analyzed data on 3044 civil servants aged 35

More information: www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.122072

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