Depression may be worse when accompanied by anger, irritability

Depression may be worse when accompanied by anger, irritability
Study followed patients for three decades.

(HealthDay)—Irritability and anger in people with major depression are associated with greater severity of depression and other problems, a long-term study suggests.

Researchers looked at data from more than 500 people who were followed for up to 31 years as part of a U.S. National Institute of Mental Health study on depression. The participants had when they entered the study between 1978 and 1981.

The new findings were published online Sept. 11 in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.

Overt irritability and anger were present in about 54 percent of the patients when they entered the study, reported Dr. Lewis Judd, of the University of California, San Diego, and colleagues.

They found that irritability and anger in these patients was associated with significantly more and longer-lasting depression, according to a journal news release. The two emotions also were associated with poorer , higher rates of lifetime substance abuse and anxiety disorder, more antisocial personality disorders, reduced and a higher rate of bipolar disorder in relatives.

Although the research showed that irritability and anger were associated with more severe depression, it did not prove that the two emotions caused the increased severity.

More information: The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has more about depression.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

How children categorize living things

9 hours ago

How would a child respond to this question? Would his or her list be full of relatives, animals from movies and books, or perhaps neighborhood pets? Would the poppies blooming on the front steps make the list or the oak tree ...

Preschoolers can reflect on what they don't know

9 hours ago

Contrary to previous assumptions, researchers find that preschoolers are able to gauge the strength of their memories and make decisions based on their self-assessments. The study findings are published in ...

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Sean_W
1 / 5 (2) Sep 12, 2013
Overt irritability and anger were present in about 54 percent of the patients when they entered the study,


Oh good, that won't apply to me because my irritability and anger are non-overt.