New research finds that enzyme is absent in Crohn's disease sufferers

Royal Veterinary College researcher Dr David Bishop-Bailey, alongside collaborators from University College London, Queen Mary University London, the University of Umeå and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences / National Institutes of Health have discovered that an enzyme which helps immune cells to clear infections caused by bacteria appears to be absent in patients suffering from Crohn's disease.

It is hoped that the findings, which have been published in the journal PLoS ONE, will open up a new pathway to investigate for therapeutic intervention in Crohn's disease, a form of Inflammatory Bowel Disease which affects thousands of people in the UK.

Crohn's Disease is a condition that causes inflammation of the digestive system, also known as the or gut and is associated with an inability to clear infections such as those caused by bacteria. Crohn's is sometimes described as a chronic condition, meaning that it is ongoing and usually lifelong.

Dr Bishop-Bailey and his colleagues used human cell lines and cells from volunteers and Crohn's disease patients to investigate the enzyme CYP2J2, as its role in sensing and clearing bacteria is currently not known and its regulation in human inflammatory diseases is poorly understood.

During their investigation they discovered that CYP2J2 helps immune cells take up bacteria to remove them and that this enzyme appears to be absent in stimulated from Crohn's disease patients.

Dr Bishop-Bailey said: "We hope that this research may open up new therapeutic avenues for Crohn's disease and lead to new tests into whether mimicking or bypassing CYP2J2 by giving its enzymatic products can lead to beneficial effects for the thousands who sufferer from this disease."

More information: Bystrom, J. et al. (2013) Inducible CYP2J2 and its product 11,12-EET promotes bacterial phagocytosis: a role for CYP2J2 deficiency in the pathogenesis of Crohn's Disease? PLoS One, 8 (9): e75107. dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0075107

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Potential Crohn's treatment starts clinical trial

Sep 17, 2013

UCF College of Medicine professor Dr. Saleh Naser soon will participate in a clinical trial to test whether a new antibiotic therapy acquired by RedHill Biopharma can be used to treat Crohn's disease patients.

Females fend off gut diseases

Jun 11, 2013

At least among mice, females have innate protection from certain digestive conditions, according to a new Michigan State University study.

How does fibrosis occur in Crohn's disease?

Jan 30, 2013

New research has shown that a protein, known as IL-13, could be the key to the development of fibrosis in Crohn's disease. This breakthrough could help to advance new medicines to treat people suffering with the disease.

Recommended for you

Flu season off to a slow start ... for now

2 hours ago

(HealthDay)—This year's flu season is off to a slow but detectable start. And it appears to be a typical one that's likely to peak in January or February, a leading U.S. health official says.

Update on new treatments for liver diseases

3 hours ago

Cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are two serious liver conditions with limited pharmacological treatments. The December issues of AGA's journals—Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Gastro ...

Amateur photographers aid in remote skin sore trial

4 hours ago

Paediatric infectious disease specialists are bringing novel skin sore research methods to WA in the form of a protocol allowing non-professional photographers to capture high-quality images of skin sores ...

WHO confirms DR Congo Ebola-free status

5 hours ago

The World Health Organization confirmed Friday that the Democratic Republic of Congo was Ebola-free, as 42 days had passed since the last case in an outbreak that killed at least 49 people.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.