Some flu vaccines promise a little more protection

by Lauran Neergaard

It's time to get your flu vaccine, and this fall some brands promise a little extra protection.

For the first time, certain vaccines will guard against four strains of flu rather than the usual three.

They're called quadrivalent vaccines, and they're so new that they'll make up only a fraction of the year's supply.

All the sold in the U.S. this year will be the four-strain kind, and a few varieties of shots.

Specialists say that's just one of many flu options to choose from, not necessarily a better one.

The government recommends a yearly for nearly everyone, starting at 6 months of age.

Early fall is the ideal time, so protection kicks in before flu starts spreading.

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