Functional outcome explored in those at risk for psychosis

Functional outcome explored in those at risk for psychosis
Measures of social and role functioning predict functional outcome in those at clinical high risk for psychosis, and poor functional outcome is not entirely dependent on conversion to full-blown disease, according to research published online Sept. 4 in JAMA Psychiatry.

(HealthDay)—Measures of social and role functioning predict functional outcome in those at clinical high risk for psychosis, and poor functional outcome is not entirely dependent on conversion to full-blown disease, according to research published online Sept. 4 in JAMA Psychiatry.

Ricardo E. Carrion, Ph.D., of the Zucker Hillside Hospital in Glen Oaks, N.Y., and colleagues conducted a prospective, naturalistic, longitudinal follow-up study of 100 patients to develop a predictive model of functional outcome in those at clinical high risk for psychosis.

The researchers found that poor social outcome was significantly associated with reduced processing speed (odds ratio [OR], 1.38), impaired social functioning at baseline (OR, 1.85), and total disorganized symptoms (OR, 5.06). Poor role outcome was significantly associated with reduced performance on tests for (OR, 1.74), role functioning at baseline (OR, 1.34), and motor disturbances (OR, 1.77). Among high-risk patients who did not convert to psychosis, 40.3 percent had poor social outcomes and 45.5 percent had poor role outcomes.

"Results from this study support the increasing emphasis on as a critically important outcome that parallels conversion to psychosis and suggest that both psychosis and long-term are equally important targets for prevention," the authors write.

Several study authors disclosed to pharmaceutical companies.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Functional MRI can improve prediction of CBT success

Jan 04, 2013

(HealthDay)—Results of functional brain imaging can greatly improve prediction of which patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) will benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), according to a study ...

Recommended for you

Brains transform remote threats into anxiety

3 hours ago

Modern life can feel defined by low-level anxiety swirling through society. Continual reports about terrorism and war. A struggle to stay on top of family finances and hold onto jobs. An onslaught of news ...

Mental disorders due to permanent stress

4 hours ago

Activated through permanent stress, immune cells will have a damaging effect on and cause changes to the brain. This may result in mental disorders. The effects of permanent stress on the immune system are studied by the ...

Could there be a bright side to depression?

5 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—A group of researchers studying the roots of depression has developed a test that leads them closer to the idea that depression may actually be an adaptation meant to help people cope with ...

Dominant people can be surprisingly social

6 hours ago

In contrast to the lay stereotype, dominant people prove to be avid social learners, just like dominant individuals in the animal kingdom. Neuroscientists from Radboud University show this with a complex ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.