More kids protected from flu; CDC says keep it up

by Lauran Neergaard

More children than ever got vaccinated against the flu last year, and health officials are urging families to do even better this time around.

A severe swept the country last winter, sparking a scramble for last-minute vaccinations. There's no way to predict if this year will be as bad. But protection requires a yearly vaccine, either a shot or nasal spray. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday it's time for people to start getting immunized.

Flu vaccine is recommended for nearly everyone ages 6 months and older. Yet just 45 percent of the population followed that advice last year. Flu is particularly risky for seniors and kids. Two-thirds of adults 65 and older, and nearly 57 percent of children, were vaccinated last year.

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