New research suggests moderate coffee consumption is not associated with increased CVD risk

September 27, 2013
coffee

Coffee is one of the most extensively researched components in the diet. New studies are regularly being added to the already large body of scientific research, which overall suggests that moderate habitual coffee consumption is not associated with detrimental effects on cardiovascular health

Among recent studies, a new review paper1 highlights that for most healthy people, moderate is unlikely to adversely affect . Furthermore a new paper2 concluded that higher and coffee consumption is inversely associated with risk of CVD and stroke in the general population.

Considerable research has also been devoted to investigating associations between coffee consumption and key risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as hypertension () and elevated cholesterol. Most evidence suggests that regular moderate consumption of caffeinated coffee has no long-term effect on blood pressure and does not increase the risk of hypertension.

A recent study suggests that moderate consumption of paper-filtered coffee may have an unfavourable effect on plasma cholesterol3. The wider body of evidence indicates that the impact of coffee on cholesterol is dependent on the brewing method. Unfiltered coffee raises serum cholesterol levels whereas this is not the case with filter coffee because the cholesterol-raising compounds in coffee are retained in the paper filter.

Throughout 2013 coffee and mortality has been a subject of several scientific research papers, which have produced conflicting results. One study4 found a 21% increase in mortality rate in those drinking more than 28 cups of coffee a week. However recent data from a meta-analysis and systematic review5 assessed 23 studies and concluded that coffee consumption is, in fact, inversely related to the risk of mortality.

More information: References

1 Rebello S.A. & van Dam R.M. (2013) Coffee Consumption and Cardiovascular Health: Getting to the Heart of the Matter. Current Cardiology Reports, 15:403.

2 Kokubo Y. et al. (2013) The Impact of Green Tea and Coffee Consumption on the Reduced Risk of Stroke Incidence in Japanese Population: The Japan Public Health Center-Based Study Cohort. Stroke, published online ahead of print.

3 Correa T.A.F. et al. (2013) Paper filtered coffee increases cholesterol and inflammation biomarkers independent of roasting degree. Nutrition, 29(7-8):977-81.

4 Liu J. et al. (2013) Association of coffee consumtpion with all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, published online ahead of print.

5 Malerba S. et al. (2013) A meta-analysis of prospective studies of coffee consumtpion and mortality for all causes, cancers and cardiovascular disease. European Journal of Epidemiology, 28(7):527-539.

Related Stories

Is there a link between coffee drinking and mortality?

February 19, 2013

(Medical Xpress)—A large study of nearly half a million older adults followed for about 12 years revealed a clear trend: as coffee drinking increased, the risk of death decreased. Study author Neal Freedman, PhD, MPH, National ...

Does Greek coffee hold the key to a longer life?

March 18, 2013

The answer to longevity may be far simpler than we imagine; it may in fact be right under our noses in the form of a morning caffeine kick. The elderly inhabitants of Ikaria, the Greek island, boast the highest rates of longevity ...

Recommended for you

New weapon in the fight against malnutrition

August 4, 2015

UBC scientists have opened the doors to new research into malnutrition by creating an animal model that replicates the imbalance of gut bacteria associated with the difficult-to-treat disease.

Can four fish oil pills a day keep the doctor away?

July 7, 2015

Fish oil is one of the most popular dietary supplements in the U.S. because of the perceived cardiovascular benefits of the omega-3 it contains. However, scientific findings on its effectiveness have been conflicting. New ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.