Obstructive lung disease linked with decline in memory and information processing

September 10, 2013

Obstructive lung disease (OLD) has been linked with a decline in cognitive functioning, including memory and information processing.

A new study, which will be presented today (11 September 2013) at the European Respiratory Society (ERS) Annual Congress, suggests that impaired could be an important factor in OLD.

Previous research has found that people with OLD, including COPD, often experience global cognitive impairments, but this new study – using the UK Biobank Resource – focused on which domain-specific cognitive functions were affected in persons with OLD.

The researchers analysed 5,764 people with OLD and 37,275 people without this condition. All participants completed a number of to examine cognitive functioning.

The results of the study showed that people with OLD performed significantly worse than people without this condition in memory tests, pairs matching tests and a reaction time test.

The authors concluded that people with OLD are more likely to experience , particularly in memory and information processing.

Lead author, Fiona Cleutjens MSc from the CIRO+, Centre of Expertise for Chronic Organ Failure in the Netherlands, said: "We know that OLD can often exist alongside other conditions and our new study has found evidence that OLD is linked with problems with memory and information processing. This can be very debilitating, especially for someone who is already dealing with the symptoms of OLD. Our findings suggest that healthcare professionals need to be aware of the possible impact of cognitive impairment in the self-management, clinical management and of OLD patients."

Related Stories

Gene is marker only for mild cognitive impairment

February 12, 2013

Defying the widely held belief that a specific gene is the biggest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, two Cornell developmental psychologists and their colleagues report that people with that gene are more likely to develop ...

Breakthrough discerns normal memory loss from disease

September 6, 2013

(Medical Xpress)—Cornell researchers have developed a reliable method to distinguish memory declines associated with healthy aging from the more-serious memory disorders years before obvious symptoms emerge. The method ...

Recommended for you

Experimental MERS vaccine shows promise in animal studies

July 28, 2015

A two-step regimen of experimental vaccines against Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) prompted immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, report National Institutes of Health scientists who designed the vaccines. ...

Can social isolation fuel epidemics?

July 21, 2015

Conventional wisdom has it that the more people stay within their own social groups and avoid others, the less likely it is small disease outbreaks turn into full-blown epidemics. But the conventional wisdom is wrong, according ...

Lack of knowledge on animal disease leaves humans at risk

July 20, 2015

Researchers from the University of Sydney have painted the most detailed picture to date of major infectious diseases shared between wildlife and livestock, and found a huge gap in knowledge about diseases which could spread ...

IBD genetically similar in Europeans and non-Europeans

July 20, 2015

The first genetic study of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to include individuals from diverse populations has shown that the regions of the genome underlying the disease are consistent around the world. This study, conducted ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

cupcaketreat
not rated yet Sep 10, 2013
Does anyone else think that this correlation could be due to a general decrease of oxygen intake to the brain?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.