Bone loss associated with increased production of ROS

October 15, 2013

Bone is constantly being broken down and remodeled. Osteoporosis results when bone resorption outpaces bone regeneration. Production of reactive oxygen species, a form of oxidative stress, has been predicted to promote bone loss, but a source of reactive oxygen is unknown.

In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Katrin Schröder and colleagues at Goethe-University identify a relationship between NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4), an enzyme that promotes formation, and resorption. In a mouse model of osteoporosis, genetic disruption or drug-induced loss of NOX4 protected the mice from bone loss.

Additionally, the authors identify a small nuclear polymorphism in NOX4 in human patients that associated with increased bone turnover. Together, these data suggest treatments targeting NOX4 activity may benefit osteoporosis patients.

Explore further: Mechanisms for a beneficial effect of moderate alcohol consumption on osteoporosis in women

More information: NADPH oxidase 4 limits bone mass by promoting osteoclastogenesis, J Clin Invest. DOI: 10.1172/JCI67603

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