Slipped capital femoral epiphysis tied to disc degeneration

Slipped capital femoral epiphysis tied to disc degeneration

(HealthDay)—Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is associated with disc degeneration as well as facet arthrosis, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

Jason O. Toy, from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, and colleagues conducted an anatomic study involving 25 cadaveric specimens with SCFE and 647 controls identified from an osteological collection of cadaveric specimens. The classification of Eubanks and colleagues were used to assess disc degeneration and facet arthrosis at L1/L2 to L5/S1.

The researchers found that SCFE was significantly associated with degenerative disc disease at all levels from L1/2 to L5/S1. SCFE was also significantly associated with facet arthrosis at these levels.

"The findings of this study show an association between SCFE and as well as facet arthrosis," the authors write. "This relationship may prove useful in predicting the course of osteoarthritis of the spine in patients with SCFE."

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