Rate of cardiovascular disease expected to rise in the US

(HealthDay)—The combined effects of aging of the population and the obesity epidemic are expected to increase the prevalence of cardiovascular disease in the United States, according to research published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

Ankur Pandya, Ph.D., of the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, and colleagues used data for 1973 to 2010 from National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys to predict risk and prevalence of cardiovascular disease for 2015 to 2030.

The researchers found that the effects of decreasing smoking rates and improved treatments on the prevalence of cardiovascular disease will be countered by aging of the population and obesity. An increase in the prevalence of cardiovascular disease is anticipated, with associated increases in health care costs, disability, and reduced quality of life.

"Our analyses show the importance of curbing and improving cholesterol and blood pressure treatment to reduce projected risk and prevalence of ," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NAFLD independently linked to cardiovascular disease

Jun 07, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but it is not associated with a statistically significantly increased ...

Recommended for you

Study highlights concern for homeless seniors

2 hours ago

A new study for the Greater Victoria Coalition to End Homelessness, co-authored by researchers at the University of Victoria and Simon Fraser University, has found that a disproportionate number of people chronically staying ...

Mateship key to boosting resilient youth

2 hours ago

Having a supportive friend who is connected to their family and greater community can be the critical factor that protects and promotes resilience in vulnerable Aboriginal youth, according to research from ...

Here's to wine, chocolate and a long, healthy life

4 hours ago

Jeanne Calment, who died in 1997 at the age of 122, remains the oldest person on record. One might assume that she led a faultless, healthy lifestyle. Not at all. Every year on her birthday, as her celebri ...

Experts discuss communications gap on vaccines

5 hours ago

The number of parents who refuse to vaccinate their children is on the rise, and with it the incidence of preventable diseases such as measles. The health community could reverse the trend by doing a better ...

User comments