Rate of cardiovascular disease expected to rise in the US

(HealthDay)—The combined effects of aging of the population and the obesity epidemic are expected to increase the prevalence of cardiovascular disease in the United States, according to research published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

Ankur Pandya, Ph.D., of the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, and colleagues used data for 1973 to 2010 from National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys to predict risk and prevalence of cardiovascular disease for 2015 to 2030.

The researchers found that the effects of decreasing smoking rates and improved treatments on the prevalence of cardiovascular disease will be countered by aging of the population and obesity. An increase in the prevalence of cardiovascular disease is anticipated, with associated increases in health care costs, disability, and reduced quality of life.

"Our analyses show the importance of curbing and improving cholesterol and blood pressure treatment to reduce projected risk and prevalence of ," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NAFLD independently linked to cardiovascular disease

Jun 07, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but it is not associated with a statistically significantly increased ...

Recommended for you

Study reveals state of crisis in Canadian foster care system

Oct 24, 2014

A new study of foster care in Canada led by a researcher at Western University reveals a shrinking number of foster care providers are available across the country to care for a growing number of children with increasingly ...

Researchers prove the benefits of persimmons for diet

Oct 24, 2014

Alba Mir and Ana Domingo, researchers from the Department of Analytical Chemistry of the University of Valencia, under the supervision of professors Miguel de la Guardia and Maria Luisa Cervera, from the same department, ...

Hand blenders used for cooking can emit persistent chemicals

Oct 24, 2014

Eight out of twelve tested models of hand blenders are leaking chlorinated paraffins when used according to the suppliers' instructions. This is revealed in a report from Stockholm University where researchers analyzed a ...

User comments