'Coverage gap' likely to affect 5.2 million uninsured adults

'Coverage gap' likely to affect 5.2 million uninsured adults

(HealthDay)—About 5.2 million uninsured adults are expected to fall into the Affordable Care Act (ACA) 'coverage gap,' with incomes too high to qualify for Medicaid programs but below the level eligible for federal subsidies to purchase private insurance, according to a report issued by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

Although the ACA provides full federal funding for three years to states that expand Medicaid to cover residents under 138 percent of the , most Republican-led states (26 states in total) have opted against expansion.

Based on census data from 2012 and 2013, and state Medicaid eligibility rules for 2014, the report estimates that 5.2 million poor, uninsured adults will fall into the 'coverage gap,' with incomes too high to qualify for existing Medicaid programs but below the federal poverty level required to be eligible for subsidies to buy private coverage through the insurance marketplaces. Almost half of the uninsured live in Texas, Florida, and Georgia. More than one-third of adults from Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana will fall into the coverage gap, and nationwide, more than one-quarter (about 27 percent) of in states not expanding Medicaid will fall into the gap.

"Millions of adults will remain outside the reach of the ACA and continue to have limited, if any, options for health coverage," the report concludes.

More information: More Information

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Patterns of health insurance coverage vary by state

Oct 08, 2013

(HealthDay)—Patterns of health insurance coverage among adults vary by state, and these differences may be used to guide efforts to expand coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), according to research ...

Recommended for you

Infertility, surrogacy in India

55 minutes ago

Infertility is a growing problem worldwide. A World Health Organization report estimates that 60-to-80 million couples worldwide currently suffer from infertility.

Tooth loss linked to slowing mind and body

13 hours ago

The memory and walking speeds of adults who have lost all of their teeth decline more rapidly than in those who still have some of their own teeth, finds new UCL research.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.