Obamacare a success so far? It's hard to say

by Patrick Condon

After more than a week in action, is President Barack Obama's health care overhaul a success or a bust? It's hard to say because there's hardly any data.

The hasn't released comprehensive data on how many people have signed up for in the 36 states using federally run exchanges, the online marketplaces for comparing and buying insurance.

In the 14 states running their own exchanges, it isn't much better. For example, it'll be mid-November before California says how many people signed up. In Oregon and Colorado, the official number is zero. In Minnesota, which embraced the Affordable Care Act, basic data won't be released until next week.

As a result, a nation trying to determine winners and losers is finding it difficult to pass immediate judgment.

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Captain Stumpy
1 / 5 (9) Oct 12, 2013
a disabled person with chronic illness / injuries would be forced to pay a monthly bill that they cannot afford in addition to an outrageously high deductible that they would not be able to pay! what would be the choice?

it would be cheaper for many to NOT sign up and pay the fine ... then we are back to the same situation! people with bills they cannot pay to hospitals, and insurance companies getting rich!
whereas people cannot be denied, the Ins. companies are hiking deductibles and payments and reducing coverage - then what happens when they decline payment as they are oft prone to do?
I was denied twice even AFTER pre-approval! finally, I just copied the pre-approval letter to the Doc and hospital and told them to go after the Ins. company.

it all circles back to end up the same way - the same situation we are in already. how does that help?
VendicarE
5 / 5 (1) Oct 13, 2013
First steps seldom produce complete solutions.

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