Seniors rarely consider switching medicare plan, provider

Seniors rarely consider switching medicare plan, provider

(HealthDay)—Most seniors report being satisfied with Medicare coverage and most would not consider switching plan or provider even though the Medicare annual open enrollment period, which lasts from Oct. 15 to Dec. 7, allows people the opportunity to make changes, according to a report from Allsup.

In an effort to examine Medicare planning and trends, Allsup Medicare Advisor conducted a survey among 1,000 randomly selected seniors aged 65 years or older who currently have Medicare coverage.

According to the report, most seniors are extremely (45 percent) or somewhat (44 percent) satisfied with their current coverage. To save money on health care, most seniors would switch to generics or use preventive screenings, but most have not and would not consider switching Medicare plan or health care provider. However, 59 percent of seniors have made spending cuts for unexpected costs, with 26 percent cutting back on groceries/food. Most are concerned about cost increases, including out-of-pocket costs, medical premiums, and prescription drug premiums.

"Comparing plans and choosing coverage can be complex. As a result many people stay where they are, missing out on important benefits and cost savings, rather than deal with the complexity," Paula Muschler, operations manager of the Allsup Medicare Advisor, said in a statement.

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