Liver tropism is key for B cell deletion immunotherapy

Antibodies against the B cell surface protein CD20 have been used successfully to treat B cell-mediated autoimmune diseases and lymphomas. Antibody binding receptors, called Fc receptors, on other immune cells bind anti-CD20 on coated B cells, which induces B cell deletion through a mechanism that is not clearly understood.

In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Philippe Bousse and colleagues at the Pasteur Institute in Paris described the fate of B in live mice after treatment with anti-CD20 antibodies. Bousse and his group found that B cells circulating through the liver were the first ones depleted after treatment and that B cells in circulation were more susceptible to deletion than those stationary in the spleen or lymph nodes. The researchers used intravital two-photon microscopy to follow B cells in the liver as they halted near specialized Fc receptor-bearing cells called Kupffer cells. The Kupffer cells bound and consumed the anti-CD20-coated B cells.

The study assigns a vital role to liver Kupffer cells in deleting B cells and describes techniques that may be used to improve the effectiveness of anti-CD20 therapy.

More information: The mechanism of anti-CD20–mediated B cell depletion revealed by intravital imaging, J Clin Invest. DOI: 10.1172/JCI70972

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

What is the function of the protein CD20?

Dec 22, 2009

Antibodies directed against the protein CD20, which is expressed by immune cells known as B cells, are used to treat B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis. Despite this, the function of CD20 has not been determined. ...

Battling defiant leukemia cells

Oct 07, 2013

Two gene alterations pair up to promote the growth of leukemia cells and their escape from anti-cancer drugs, according to a study in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Recommended for you

Structured education program beneficial for anaphylaxis

Nov 21, 2014

(HealthDay)—A structured education intervention improves knowledge and emergency management for patients at risk for anaphylaxis and their caregivers, according to a study published online Nov. 19 in Allergy.

Every step you take: STING pathway key to tumor immunity

Nov 20, 2014

A recently discovered protein complex known as STING plays a crucial role in detecting the presence of tumor cells and promoting an aggressive anti-tumor response by the body's innate immune system, according to two separate ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.