Non-celiac wheat sensitivity may be an allergy

Non-celiac wheat sensitivity may be an allergy

(HealthDay)—Non-celiac wheat sensitivity (NCWS) may be a non-immunoglobulin E-mediated food allergy, according to a review published online Nov. 5 in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Antonio Carroccio, M.D., from the University of Palermo in Italy, and colleagues reviewed both the literature and data collected from 276 patients diagnosed with NCWS during a double-blind placebo-controlled challenge. The role of serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and the basophil activation assay in food allergy, as well as histology findings in the food allergy diagnosis, were reviewed.

When comparing patients with (IBS) not due to NCWS and suffering from NCWS and IBS, the researchers found that NCWS was significantly associated with a personal history of in the pediatric age (P = 0.01), coexistent atopic diseases (P = 0.0001), positive serum anti-gliadin (P = 0.0001) and anti-betalactoglobulin (P = 0.001) antibodies, positive cytofluorimetric assay revealing in-vitro basophil activation by food antigens (P = 0.0001), and a presence of eosinophils in the intestinal mucosa biopsies (P = 0.0001).

"NCWS can now be considered the cause of gastrointestinal symptoms, which overlap those commonly attributed to functional disorders," Carroccio said in a statement. "However, many doubts remain and it must be underlined that we must utilize the double-blind placebo-controlled challenge method to confirm the suspicion of NCWS and then study the pathogenesis of that specific clinical manifestation. A confident NCWS diagnosis must exclude a placebo effect."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Allergic disease linked to irritable bowel syndrome

Jan 30, 2008

Adults with allergy symptoms report a high incidence of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), suggesting a link between atopic disorders and IBS according to a study published this month in Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, ...

You can have a food allergy, and eat it too

Nov 08, 2013

Have food allergies? If you answered yes, you know the best way to prevent a severe allergic reaction is to totally avoid the offending food. But according to a presentation at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the American ...

Recommended for you

Commensal bacteria help orchestrate immune response in lung

Sep 11, 2014

Studies in mice demonstrate that signals from the bacteria that harmlessly—and often beneficially—inhabit the human gastrointestinal tract boost the immune system's ability to kill a major respiratory pathogen, Klebsiella pn ...

How age alters our immune response to bereavement

Sep 09, 2014

Young people have a more robust immune response to the loss of a loved one, according to new research from the University of Birmingham, providing insight into how different generations cope with loss.

User comments